The Old Hat Manifesto

My father cried on November 16, 1957. He was 12 years old. He wept on my grandfather’s lap because he had just experienced something he had no recollection of ever experiencing before: his beloved Oklahoma Sooners lost a football game for the first time in more than 4 years. When OU began their 47-game winning streak, he was only 8 years old. So there he sat, tears flowing down his cheeks, while his father held him and assured him that everything would be okay. 

On Saturday afternoons in the early 1980s, my father and I would get in the car and leave our farmhouse in Guthrie, Oklahoma for the hour drive to Norman. Going to OU football games was not something I could take for granted, but often I would have begged enough that my dad would give in. Sometimes it was just the two of us, sometimes the whole family. We’d stop by James and Maryanna Martin’s tailgate for fried chicken. We’d watch The Pride of Oklahoma (OU’s marching band) warm up. We’d throw a football around on the South Oval. And I would bring every dollar I had saved so I could buy a new OU jersey at the stadium. But the best part was sitting next to my dad while he explained the finer points of the game of football to me. 

I remember where I was when the Denver Broncos won their first Super Bowl. I know who I was with, the exact furniture that was in the room, and most importantly, I remember the emotions I felt. I remember driving to Kansas City to see the Broncos play the Chiefs. I remember night after night at the Lloyd Noble Center with my brother and dad, watching Wayman, Mookie, Tim and Stacey play basketball. I remember the flyover at the old Mile High Stadium before the game started and how loud and overwhelming it was. I remember meeting Ozzie Smith in the parking garage outside Busch Stadium and getting him to sign a ball for me before we took in an afternoon Cardinals game. I remember standing next to my best friend in Oklahoma Memorial Stadium as the clock wound down after OU beat #1 Nebraska 31-14 after spending years in that same stadium with him watching OU lose game after game after game.

I remember, because those moments are important. I remember, because now that I am older and my brother has moved a thousand miles away, my best friend and I rarely make time for each other, and I don’t see my father nearly as much as I should, those moments are what I hold as my most prized possessions. 

I’ve never met anyone, regardless of how much of a sports fan they are, who doesn’t have at least one great memory surrounding a sporting event. Chances are, they get emotional when they think about these experiences. Some people have one. Some people have many. I’m lucky… I have hundreds.

Sports are important, plain and simple. They bring people together and shape lives through shared moments that last a lifetime. It’s not about whether your team wins or loses, it’s about the memory you created just being a part of the event. 

Old Hat believes that there’s nothing greater than sharing a sports experience with someone you care about. We also believe that the purity of these moments is being lost to technology and convenience. The statistics show it. 

Too often families opt to stay at home, with everyone in separate rooms of the house staring at their own devices and not connecting with one another. Kids are upstairs in their rooms playing Minecraft or texting their friends while dad is downstairs in his man cave binge-watching Netflix. When that child is 80 years old, they aren’t going to be telling their grandchildren about the Saturday afternoon they spent playing video games. But being outside on a Saturday afternoon with thousands of other people screaming for the same cause, a ballpark hot dog in their hands and their hero… their father… sitting next to them? That creates a moment that will live on forever.

Old Hat exists for the sole purpose of helping create those moments for people. Whether through driving attendance to sporting events, improving the gameday experience once inside the stadium or arena, aiding in fundraising efforts for athletic departments and their capital campaigns, or any one of the many other things that a sports organization must do to put teams on the field, Old Hat is here to help.