Big changes to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) will take effect on December 1, 2016. That means you have the first half of the school year to: (a) get as much overtime out of your current employees as possible while you still can, and (b) figure out how the heck you’re going to make things work when the new rules go into effect. 

Here’s the issue in a nutshell: you won’t be able to afford to keep doing things the way you do them today. 

We all know that there’s no such thing as a 40 hour workweek for employees in collegiate athletics. Especially not for employees at the lower end of the pay scale. Right now, you don’t have to pay overtime rates to professional, administrative or executive employees whose salaries are $23,660 per year or more. But come December, that threshold jumps to $47,476 per year. So here’s the question: can you survive without all the overtime hours your lower-paid employees currently work, or can you afford to pay them a lot more in the future? 

It’s not like you have a bunch of extra money laying around. And if you’re a Division I school, you may already in a budget crunch thanks to recent changes related to food service and scholarship rules.

Unfortunately, your practices, games, and related activities are not going to magically start fitting into a tidy little 40 hour workweek…no matter how many of you write letters to Santa. 

Something’s gotta give.

Here’s our advice: cut your creative staff.

Yep. You heard that right. 

Drastic times call for drastic measures. 

So yeah. Your graphic designer. Your video production specialist. Send’em packing.

We’re not saying you don’t need marketing support. Of course you do! It’s just that you don’t need to keep those individuals on your staff as yet another piece of your salary and overtime puzzle. And even if your marketing team isn’t working overtime, we all know they’re still a likely target when budget cuts come around.

The way we see it, you’ve got 3 alternatives to consider.

#1 – Hire Freelancers

If you’ve never tried it before, this might sound like a good idea. But most of you who have been around the block once or twice are cringing right now. Most athletic departments haven’t had a lot of luck with freelancers providing consistently high-quality work that’s on time and on target. Unless you have a freelancer who has worked with you before or who came from the collegiate athletics marketing industry, you’ll probably find they lack the expertise and insight you’re looking for. On the other hand, if you’re lucky enough to have found a really great freelancer, that person is probably working a lot more than 40 hours for you at an annual salary that’s lower than the new FLSA threshold…which means in December, you’ll have the same problem with your freelance rock star as you would with your own in-house staff.

#2 – Two Words: Student Internship

Hey, look around. In your neighborhood, there’s no shortage of young soon-to-be-professionals eager to build their resumes and score some real-world experience. And most of them don’t want to work anywhere close to 40 hours a week anyway. Assembling a low-cost creative staff will be like shooting fish in a barrel! What could possibly go wrong? Well, other than lack of experience, inconsistency, the need for a lot of oversight, not having any of the aforementioned industry expertise, some pesky rules or limitations… Reality check: you get what you pay for. There’s a reason you haven’t relied on this type of manpower to serve as your creative staff before. Sure, you may have some top-notch students who help you out from time to time, and that’s great. But as a year-over-year strategy, trying to rely on them to fill the gap FLSA is about to create won’t earn you a barrel of Gatorade over the head.

#3 – Outsource It

If only you knew somebody with a wealth of industry experience, mad design skills, a deep bench of talent, and serious strategic chops that you could hire and rely on without having to even think about overtime or paying a higher salary. Oh, wait. You do. All joking aside, Old Hat can provide everything you need from a creative standpoint. From design to video production, project management, strategic planning and copywriting, we offer a full range of creative services. We’re good enough, we’re smart enough, and doggone it, people like us. If you don’t have your dream team in place right now, take them off your payroll and let us be your creative staff instead. Want to have a designer right there on campus with you? No problem – we can be the one to hire them, pay them, and worry about their hours, plus we’ve got the capacity to absorb any excess work. 

Or don’t cut your creative staff. Augment them the smart way.

If you love your current creative staff or freelancer, don’t fire them just because you can’t afford to pay them enough to meet all your needs. I mean, really. Do we come across as that callous or short-sighted? (For the record, we’re neither.) Instead, let us augment your team and handle all those extra hours you can’t afford to pay them for. Old Hat can provide you subscription-style creative support that will cost you a lot less in the long run than paying overtime rates or higher salaries, while delivering the highest quality results. We’ll work with you to come up with a plan that gives you all services you need, when you need them. We’ll even dedicate somebody to becoming your brand expert. Everybody wins! Want to talk it over? Give us a call.

 

College football season is only days away and the thought of adding another project to your list probably makes you want to bury your head in the turf. But with all of the success we've had with ticket sales websites and marketing automation, I frequently get asked when the best time to launch a site is. And unfortunately for those of you who might not see the light of day, much less your families, until the end of November, my answer is: Football season. 

Honestly, no matter what time of year it is, I think it's a good time to launch a ticket sales site. However, if I were to get to choose any time of the year to launch with the goal of having the most potential success, I'd launch midway through the football season every time. There are just too many opportunities to take advantage of during the season that don't exist any other time of the year and if your goal is to sell more tickets, which I think it might be, the time to launch is in the Fall... which means the time to start the project is now.

Here are the top 5 reasons to launch a ticket sales site during the football season:

1. Excitement is high. There's no better time to take advantage of the excitement than during the season. Even if they aren't necessarily making a purchase, a fan is much more likely to go to the website during the football season because football is top-of-mind. The whole goal of marketing automation is to get them to the site at least once so we can start targeting them with communication tailored to their interests. It's easier to drive traffic to a football ticket sales website during football season than any other time. 

2. Renewals. The best way to drive traffic to your newly launched website is by making it the preferred avenue to renew season tickets. If that's where fans have to go to renew their tickets, that's a great way to drive them to the site initially. You also want them to see all of the options to upgrade their seating rather than just renewing what they already have. You want to start promoting renewals toward the end of the season so you need to have the site up and running in advance of that. 

3. Videoboard and a Captive Audience. So you have a message you want to send to your most passionate fan base. And it just so happens that you have all of those people in one place on a Saturday afternoon. Add to that the fact that you have a monstrocity of a videoboard they'll all be staring at during breaks in action and you have a perfect opportunity to tell them about the new site. Launch it a week after the season ends, and you just missed the chance to put that URL in front of 50,000 of your most die-hard fans.

4. Converting Single to Season. There's a good chance that a good number of those fans in the stands aren't currently season ticket holders. Maybe they bought a single game ticket. Or maybe they came with a friend that has season tickets. Point is, here's a perfect opportunity to turn them into season ticket holders by 1) collecting info on them (we can help with that too) 2) promoting the site to them and 3) following up with communication after the game to drive them to purchase. There could be thousands of potential season ticket holders at those games that are having a blast and thinking about how they'd like to come more often. Strike while the iron is hot and get them to the site before their excitement dwindles.

5. There's So Much You Can't Control. Let's say you're one of the fortunate ones and you're trying to sell tickets for a program that's having a lot of success. You have to take advantage of that immediately while your fans are excited and there's a buzz about town. You never know what could happen a week after the season ends. If that successful coach takes another job, you lose people. And what if your program isn't successful? Well, you need all the time you can get to drive ticket sales. And there's no better way to learn about your fans, their buying habits and what is going to convert them into purchasers than using the data you can get through marketing automation. 

 

Launching a uniquely positioned, dedicated ticket sales website with marketing automation is a great idea no matter what time of year it is. But if you truly want to put yourself in a position to have the greatest opportunity for success, start gathering information now and launch mid-season. You'll be glad you did.

 

Check out our recently launched gameday and ticket sales website, complete with marketing automation: gethereforgameday.com

 

 

One of my favorite things about the Olympics are the advertisements during and leading up to the Games. Yeah, I said it. I LOVE COMMERCIALS. I know there have been a lot of complaints about the volume of spots during the Opening Ceremonies as well as the Prime Time broadcasts, but I tend to agree with the notion that folks are just becoming more intolerant. The numbers for the Opening Ceremonies actually dropped compared to the 2012 London Games. While I get that these interruptions can be annoying, it's not like we're getting the local auto dealership and mesothelioma lawsuit ads. Every two years the very best in athletic competition is complemented with the very best in advertising. I'll be totally okay taking a 4.5 minute break every 15 minutes if the product remains as entertaining and inspirational as the events themselves.

Here are some of my personal favorites:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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