No, this isn't my home. And there's a pretty good chance this isn't your home either. But for about 80,000 proud USC fans, the LA Coliseum is home on Saturdays in the fall. The Coliseum has been home to so many during its storied history, dating all the way back to 1923. That's why the newly announced Coliseum Renovation is a renovation of such magnitude- not only because of the funding involved ($270 million)- but because of the impact it will have on those that have called it, or will someday call it home.

USC has recently taken over ownership of the Coliseum, and with that came the necessity to bring the Coliseum back to its original glory, but they're doing more than just knocking off the cobwebs and doing some touch-up painting. Better seating for all fans plus the addition of high-end loge, club, suite and lounge areas will ensure that the Coliseum remains the premier game day destination for USC fans and football enthusiasts. The newly renovated Coliseum (scheduled to debut in time for the 2019 home opener) will transform the watching of a great team and a great game into a memory-making experience. And that's at the core of every sport at every level.

Through great collaboration and input from USC, Old Hat designed and developed the Coliseum Renovation website, and I'm proud to have played some part in the eventual renaissance of such an iconic landmark. And that's exactly what the Coliseum is: not only a football stadium but a historic, iconic landmark. If you just browse through the history of the Coliseum you can see how much impact it has had not only for college and professional football, but Olympic sports, politics, entertainment, and most importantly its original purpose as a dedication to veterans of WWI. 

I had the chance to visit the Coliseum during our discovery trip to USC, which was set up to talk through all aspects of the website. I admit I didn't have quite the appreciation for the Coliseum that I have now. Being involved with this project has really given me an understanding as to why USC is so intent on bringing back the original grandeur of the Coliseum. Fans should be proud to call this place home.

 

Great tour of the Coliseum with USC folks today. Coming out of the tunnel...

A photo posted by Robert Smith (@elguapo76) onJul 23, 2015 at 4:46pm PDT

A few years ago, an acquaintance of mine decided he was going to start a sports apparel company. Like most new businesses, he was starting with nothing. He had no facility, he had no customers, he had no product. He just had an idea. 

Oh, and he had one more thing. He applied to a program through the SBA that provided him with a steady stream of potential customers with built in brand loyalty to his new company. He didn't have to do a single thing to create that brand loyalty. This program was revolutionary. The government would take large groups of young people and spend four years slowly building an affinity within them for this guy's brand. They'd give these kids free product, they'd surround them with this company's logo and they'd teach these impressionable young minds songs that furthered a love for this guy's company. And every year, after spending four years instilling passion within these potential customers, the program would release thousands of them into the world where they would make more money than nearly half of the population.

Needless to say, my friend's company was set up to be a smashing success. Every year from the start of his company until the end of time, he had 5,000+ people who automatically loved his brand. All he had to do was supply them with a good product. Some of these people were more passionate than others, of course. And he couldn't retain them all. But what he found was that for the rest of these people's lives, they had at least some affinity for his product. On top of that, their ability to afford his product was better than average. So of course he was incredibly successful…how could he not be?

Apply Here

What was the name of this company? It doesn't matter because I made it all up. That is, I made up the idea that this was someone's company that couldn’t help but succeed. The rest of it happens every year at hundreds of organizations.

On average, about 1.8 million people receive bachelor's degrees from colleges and universities in the United States. The vast majority spent about four years being surrounded by that university's brand every single day. They walked past hundreds of signs, pole banners and trash cans all bearing that institution's logo. They sat next to thousands of other students wearing t-shirts with that university's brand across the front. They were taught the history of their school, songs they will never forget, and traditions that reinforced their love for their school. And then, after four years of this indoctrination, they are released into the world with the ability to earn an average of $18,000 more per year than those who did not attend college.

Can you imagine what Nike would do for that kind of exposure? What do you think Nike would pay to have their logo on every banner, trash can, building and sign on a college campus? The value of that level of exposure to a brand is incalculable. As a business owner I can tell you that I would have killed to have been able to start my business with a group of customers that already loved my company.

Spoiled Sports

Those of us who work in collegiate athletics are spoiled. We’re playing with a stacked deck and we’re still losing. We have something Nike would pay millions of dollars for and that businesses everywhere dream about. I've used the number 5,000 in talking about the number of graduates that come out of a university each year. Some are less, obviously. But some have double or triple that number. The point is that collegiate athletics departments have four years of free marketing opportunities handed to them on a silver platter, and there are thousands of people graduating from universities every year who have will have some level of affinity for their alma mater for the rest of their lives.

No other industry in the world has this advantage. No one ever says, "Well, I wear Adidas because my grandpa wore Adidas and my dad wore Adidas." Even professional sports teams have less of an automatic fan base and less built-in loyalty than collegiate athletics. 

If you have empty seats at your stadium or arena, you have no excuse. Or at least you don't have nearly the excuse that organizations in every other industry has if they're failing to bring in customers. If alumni aren’t coming back to support your athletic program, it’s because the product you’re asking them to support isn't good enough.

Winning Isn't Everything

The argument can be made that fans would come if the team would win and that as marketers, we can't control the product on the field. But the decrease in attendance among collegiate athletics isn't isolated to losing programs. Winning teams are losing fans too. The product on the field is great but fans are still choosing to stay home.

At home, the beer is cheaper, the couch is more comfy and the temperature is always a nice 72 degrees. That’s hard to compete with, but not impossible. Because we do have an advantage: they already love us. They spent four years seeing our logo, wearing our clothes and singing our songs. 

We might not be able to control the product on the field, but there’s a lot more to the home-or-stadium decision than that. We can control ticket prices. We can control advertising. We can control strategically targeting the fans most likely to attend and understanding what makes them tick. And we can control the gameday experience. 

So what about my theoretical friend and his theoretical business? Was success really that easy for him? Of course not. He had to work at it. He had to realize that he couldn’t rely on the same old tricks to get fans to the stadium. He had to stop taking his steady stream of brand loyalists and their disposable income for granted, and start doing more to give them a product that is better than staying home. That was when he started succeeding. And if he didn’t do those things and ended up failing even when the deck was stacked in his favor, then he had nobody to blame but himself.

Mister Speaker, Mister Vice President, Members of Congress, my fellow Americans,

Today marks another spring that I've come to report on the State of Productions at Old Hat. And for this one, I’m going to try to make it a little shorter. (Applause.) I know some of you are antsy to get back to Iowa. (Laughter.)

See I knew copying the actual State of the Union could only take me so far in this entry. (Laughter.) Instead, let me present to you a reel of some of our best work from 2015-16 (Applause.):

Luckily for me, all of the really hard work was already done by our production team. They make amazing creative with often impossible deadlines. It has become so old hat, if you will, it's easy to forget the amount effort that goes into it. Go team! The challenging part of this process was picking the projects to include for a one-minute reel. If the criteria for making it into the reel was "cool stuff" well then we'd have a ten-minute video. And who has time for that when there are obviously more important things to do?

I like to make sure to include all of the various services we offer: Intro/Hype Videos, Historical Videos, Commercials, 3D Logo Animations, TV/Video Board Graphics Packages, Fan Entertainment Games, Player Features, On-Location Shoots, Crowd Prompts, Sponsor/Promotional Animations and Court Projection Mapping. That's a lot of stuff to be awesome at.

A common look that everybody was doing last year was the highlight imagery within the player. A lot of organizations did a solid job of utilizing that look. I think the two biggest songs from 2015-16 were Nina Simone's "Feeling Good" (I think we can all thank Auburn Basketball 2014-15 for that one) and The Fugees "Ready or Not" from the Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation trailer. I suspect a few football programs will probably use those songs for this upcoming 2016 season. 

Our goals for 2016-17 will be to continue to push our designs, our shoot and video concepts, and our writing. Gotta stay ahead of the pack. This is what we're doing right now during our spring months: Laying the foundation for the fall. You don't just go out and run a marathon. You have to train for it months ahead of time. That's how our creative works. We're spending hundreds of hours researching design, concepts, and music so that when all of the fall projects start pouring in we're ready to roll and the creative doesn't suffer.

One tool to help with our creative goals is a new video questionairre designed to help us understand your team(s) better and deliver super-ridiculously-awesome videos. It includes questions about department goals, things to improve on this year, favorite videos from last season, and any special landmarks, quotes or stories that could help make your video unique. While direction such as "make it cool" is encouraging, it's our aim to be an even more integral part of your team and know everything about you. We're your number one fan. Sort of like Kathy Bates in Misery.

And that’s why I stand here confident as I have ever been that the State of Productions is strong. (Applause.)

(Laughter.)

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