My father cried on November 16, 1957. He was 12 years old and he wept on my grandfather’s lap as he had just experienced something he had no recollection of ever experiencing before. His beloved Oklahoma Sooners lost a football game for the first time in more than 4 years. When OU began their 47-game winning streak, he was only 8 years old. So there he sat, tears flowing down his cheeks, while his father held him and assured him that everything would be okay. 

On Saturday afternoons in the early 1980s, my father and I would get in the car and leave our farmhouse in Guthrie, Oklahoma for the hour drive to Norman. Going to OU football games was not guaranteed but often I would have begged enough that my dad would give in and take me. Sometimes the whole family. Sometimes just me. We’d stop by the tailgate of James and Maryanna Martin for fried chicken. We’d go watch The Pride of Oklahoma (OU’s marching band) warm up. We’d throw a football around on the South Oval. And I would bring every dollar I had saved so I could buy a new OU jersey at the stadium. But the best part was sitting next to my dad while he explained the finer points of the game of football to me.

I remember where I was when the Denver Broncos won their first Super Bowl. I know who I was with, what I was wearing and most importantly, I remember the emotions I felt. I remember driving to Kansas City to see the Broncos play the Chiefs. I remember night after night at the Lloyd Noble Center with my brother and dad watching Wayman, Mookie, Tim and Stacey play basketball. I remember the flyover at the old Mile High Stadium before the game started and how loud and overwhelming it was. I remember meeting Ozzie Smith in the parking garage outside Busch Stadium and getting him to sign a ball for me before we took in an afternoon Cardinals game. I remember standing next to my best friend in Oklahoma Memorial Stadium as the clock wound down after OU beat #1 Nebraska 31-14 after spending years in that same stadium watching OU lose game after game after game with him.

I remember, because those moments are important. I remember, because now that I am older and my brother has moved a thousand miles away, my best friend and I rarely make time for each other and I don’t see my father nearly as much as I should, those moments are what I hold as my most prized possessions. No one can take them from me and I’ll take those memories to my grave. 

These are the moments that sports create. Sports brings people together and creates moments shared by fathers and sons, mothers and daughters, brothers and sisters, and friends. I’ve never met anyone, regardless of how much of a sports fan they are, who doesn’t have at least one great memory surrounding a sporting event. They remember where they were, who they were with and what happened at that event that made it so special. Chances are, they get emotional when they think about these experiences. I get emotional just talking about it. Some people have one. Some people have many. I’m lucky… I have hundreds.

Sports are important, plain and simple. Sporting events provide an avenue for people to have experiences that shape their lives. Sports gives people memories that stay with them til the day they die. More often than not, even when their team lost, the memory is held as a fond one.

Sporting events are in a battle with convenience. And the statistics show that we are losing. Kids are upstairs in their rooms playing Minecraft or texting their friends while dad is downstairs in his man cave binge-watching Netflix. When that child is 80 years old, they aren’t going to be telling their grandchildren about the Saturday afternoon they spent playing video games. But being outside on a Saturday afternoon with thousands of other people screaming for the same cause, a ballpark hot dog in their hands and their hero… their father… sitting next to them? That creates a moment that will live on forever.

Old Hat exists for the sole purpose of helping create those moments for people. Whether through driving attendance to sporting events, improving the gameday experience once inside the stadium or arena, aiding in fundraising efforts for athletic departments and their capital campaigns, or any one of the many other things that a sports organization must do to put teams on the field, Old Hat is here to help.

Old Hat believes that there’s nothing greater than sharing a sports experience with someone you care about. We also believe that the purity of these moments is being lost to technology and convenience. Too often families opt to stay at home, everyone in separate rooms of the house staring at their own devices and not connecting with one another. My son will have no memory of the Saturday afternoon he spent playing Minecraft while I watched Breaking Bad on Netflix. However, he still remembers going to the OU vs. Texas football game when he was only 8 years old. He doesn’t remember it because OU won or lost. He remembers it because he was with his brother and his dad. He will always remember it. Because of the experience.

In exciting news out of Norman, the creative agency formerly known as Old Hat Creative, announces the beginning of a new era with a name and logo change. "Ideas Designed to Inspire Through Strategy," abbreviated, "ID.ITS", is the new moniker. "This new name really encapsulates who we are," says CEO and now lead of the ID.ITS, Zac Logsdon. "We feel like this change has been long in the making." says Logsdon. "We've always felt like we were ID.ITS. Now, it's as if for the first time we're actually being our true selves...and if it wasn't known before, it's now evident for everyone else to see with our new company name and logo!"

Robert Smith, Chief Operating Officer and Director of Client Relations, took a leadership role in both the name change and the logo development. Smith says, "I don't mind saying I really inserted myself into the logo project from day one. It was kind of my baby, and something I wanted to be as much a reflection of myself as it was a reflection of our new company and direction. I feel like Zac has been leading us towards this direction for 12 long years and now we're so excited to finally be ID.ITS!"  

Much thought went into the actual logo design. Smith explains, "Some of the more obvious choices were using the color red, which as any marketer knows, represents love and profitability. Both of which are needed in any company." Logsdon continues, "Because Old Hat has made a clear shift to the digital age, we included the large dot in our logo to indicate we know the World Wide Web, often referred to as the Net." Particular aspects of the former logo were also tied in. Rather than having the word "Creative" in the new logo, the group opted to use a small "c" placed strategically above the "I", as a nod to their past designation.

Smith says that an important lesson was learned during this process. "We originally chose the tag line 'Ideas Designed to Inspire By Strategy', but because of the problem it would present with our logo acronym, we changed 'by' to 'through'. Paying attention to these types of details can prevent you from looking like a real idiot with your peers and others in your industry. Nobody wants their acronym to include 'IBS'. That's just dumb."

When seeing Logsdon and Smith explain the reasons for the changes together, it's evident that this change is truly the correct decision. It's like they share one mind. The mind of "ID.ITS". 

Every year, one of your key variables for season ticket sales is churn: how many fans repurchase a package and how many defect? Once you know that, you’re faced with another decision: how much do you spend to regain those lost fans? Will it be easier and more cost-efficient to try to win them back, or should you invest more in replacing them with new purchasers?

Business studies have shown that in general it’s more cost effective to retain customers (and employees, for that matter) than to recruit new ones. Yet most businesses tend to write off lost customers pretty quickly. Is that a mistake? In a word: yes. According to a recent Harvard Business Review article companies with high churn rates might be better off trying to win lost customers back than trying to replace them. But that doesn’t mean every lost customer is worth pursuing: “Simply identifying those who are most likely to sign up again, rather than appealing to every defector, can increase win-back rates eightfold.”

Sure, the article was written based on analysis of a telecom company’s customers defection and win-back rather than about sports marketing, but the principles are the same:

·         - People who have purchased something from you before have demonstrated a specific interest in what you offer.

·         - People who are familiar with you are more likely to be responsive than those who have no history with you or no brand awareness.

·         - Not every lost customer is worth winning back, and data analysis can help you understand which lost customers hold the most potential.

·         - Tailoring your win-back offers based on the reason for defection is more likely to help you regain the customers you lost than simply offering everyone the same thing.

·          - Learning from the customers you’ve lost can help you improve retention of current customers.

To apply these principles to your marketing efforts, follow these 3 steps:

1. Survey. If somebody chooses not to repurchase a season ticket package from you, find out why. Online surveys are a great way to do this efficiently and to aggregate your results, while follow-up phone calls may help you get deeper information. No matter who you approach, understanding why people left is essential to improving both current sales and future retention. You’ll want to make sure your survey tool includes questions related to different aspects of the game and season ticket experience so you can pinpoint what drive their decision to leave and what might win them back.

2. Segment. Divide your lost fans into segments based on their reason for leaving and likelihood to reconsider. Doing this allows you to decide who’s worth pursuing and what your potential recapture volume looks like. Realistically, you’ll have a least 3 segments: one that’s unlikely to return, one that you may be able to convert to periodic ticket sales, and one that you may be able to win back as season ticket holders. Ideally, you’ll want to segment on fairly specific reasons for leaving (i.e. affordability, in-venue experience, number of games attended, etc.). If you have one or more segments that are very unlikely to return, don’t waste time and money trying to sell them another season ticket package. Instead, look at whether you can fix any of their reasons for leaving to improve retention of your current season ticket holders.

3. Strategize. Once you’ve segmented your lost customer base, develop a marketing strategy for each segment you choose to re-engage. Tailor your offers or incentives as much as possible to each segment. If you have a segment that left because they felt season tickets weren’t affordable, consider offering a discount. If you have a segment that left because they were only able to attend half of the games, consider creating a special ticket bundle that serves the needs to those who want to attend multiple games but don’t plan to attend the full season. Similarly, consider how you can convert people into periodic ticket purchasers even if you can’t win them back as season ticket holders. For fans who were dissatisfied with some aspect of the game experience, look for ways to address those needs (VIP packing bundles, meet-the-team experiences, etc.).

If you’re looking for ways to improve season ticket holder retention and regain lost ticket sales, we can help! Ask us about the options we offer for market research, strategy development, and fan engagement.

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