A wise man once said, "I love it when a plan comes together." That's the best way I could describe how I felt after delivering the University of Illinois Football Intro Video. It started all the way back on April 25th with a simple email, subject line "This might be something in 2016-17" and a link to a song. And the rest they say is "history." Or is it "yada yada yada?" Just kidding, I'm not going to gloss over the numbers.

  • 9 locations total for this shoot. I love touring a pretty college campus on a golf cart. It's an underappreciated video asset right outside your front door: well-manicured lawns, beautiful landscaping, unique architecture and statues for days! We only used the campus beauty shots for about :13, but I think they worked well in setting the scene with the music and the voice over. We photographed the players in the indoor practice facility (gotta love a steamy venue in July) as well as their locker room (thankfully air conditioned).
 
 
  •  1 concept from the get-go. Dustin and I have been wanting to do some type of stop-motion photography in a practical sports setting with the athletes for several years now. In the past we've shot the photographs with a black background. I like the stop-motion look because it gives the athletes a really cool stop-and-start look that worked quite well with the music.
 
  • 3617 photographs shot. That's a lot of strobe lights going off in about three hours. Thankfully, there were no light-induced seizures that afternoon. It was quite bright. Without getting TOO technical, for most of our videos there are 30 frames of video per second. So if we're shooting photographs we'll need a lot to fill about 60% of the one minute video.
 

  • 120 photos actually scripted and used in the final edit Yeah, that's not a very big percentage. Sorry, Dustin. We used the best stills or series of stills and then had to make room for campus shots, graphics, and of course highlights. WE'VE ONLY GOT ONE MINUTE!!
 
  • 16 Illini football student athletes. Listen, shoots are cool, but they're hard work, they take time, and you're often waiting your turn...in the steamy indoor football facility. I've worked with hundreds of players over the last eight years and these guys were absolutely great to work with. They followed directions, brought enthusiasm and intensity, and were very patient. We had them in full pads and gear and I didn't hear one complaint. Coach Smith has a great group this year. We got awesome photographs and the guys got done an hour early. Win-win.



He was actually growling at Dustin. It was fantastic.

  • 5,000 the number of times I listened to "The House of the Rising Sun" at my computer, driving home, mowing the lawn. I'm a big fan of covers done well.

  • 8 Illini Athletic Marketing staff members holding lights, carrying boxes, bringing us 5lb bags of Swedish Fish, driving us around campus. Amazing group of awesomeness led by the Canadian King of Awesomeness Brad Wurthman.
 
  • 3 Old Hatters just doing what they love to do.
 
 
  • 48,644 fans in attendance at Memorial Stadium for the 52-3 victory over Murray State.
 

With college football’s “Best Kickoff Weekend Ever” just finished, there’s no better time to look back at many of our fall sports posters for this season. Several of these football designs were rightfully noted in best-of preseason poster rankings and those ranks are listed below. Since volleyball, soccer and other sports have also fired up their seasons recently, we’ll show off their designs as well.

SMU

Poster Swag #33 and Bleacher Report #11

If you follow the Old Hat blog, you may have seen several stories about the SMU 'Get Here For Gameday' campaign. Following the Sports 180 process and significant research, this poster was created by Jared Stanley. "The whole point of the poster was to make gameday something not to be missed in the city of Dallas," Jared said. "The inspiration was superhero movie posters." Mission accomplished! This was the only poster that was mentioned on both preseason poster rankings. Other fall sports posters were created from this template and are shown below.

 

Pittsburgh

Poster Swag #12 

Old Hat designer Geoff Rogers has designed nearly 900 posters in his nine years here. (So doing great design is 'old hat' to Geoff? Sorry...) This was his favorite from this year, which was a tough choice over several other great options. Pitt wanted to spotlight their new uniforms, their facilty and players. The key Geoff says is "taking the client suggestions and then using his expertise to make it look good. And it's so much more than making it look good, it's being a problem solver. Using what you have and the time you have to do to it to achieve what the client wants." This poster also became a template for other fall sports, each using the same look and layout of Geoff's football masterpiece.

 

Florida State

Bleacher Report #17

These are my favorite for multiple reasons. I've been a fan of Seminole football since the early 90s and I was fortunate to be able to design this year's poster(s). Just as Geoff said above, we take the ideas from the client and meld them into something special. There are several things going on in these posters that might not be visible at first glance. The state outline in the background is a reference to FSU victories last year over Miami, Florida and South Florida. Several background images of note (behind the state and the players) include the new HD videoboard, Chief Osceola and Renegade and two of my favorite all-time Noles (Derrick Brooks and Charlie Ward). Raymond James Stadium is the site of the National Championship this year and if you look closely, it's the reflection in Jimbo Fisher's sunglasses. Finally with three posters, we were able to highlight 30 members of the team. If recent drafts are any indication, most of those guys will be in the NFL in a few years.

 

Utah

Poster Swag #49 

Douglas Wilson is Old Hat's designer for the University of Utah. He's located in Salt Lake City, working on campus with the Utes. While he doesn't work with the variety of schools and color combos that the other designers do, he certainly has the look for Utah nailed down as you see with his posters here. He says that while sometimes it can be difficult working with those who have ideas different than your own, it's satisfying to create something that balances both sets of ideas to make the best design possible. The client is usually good with what you create as long as the essence of their ideas remains intact.

Western Michigan

Poster Swag #40


Florida International

Poster Swag #24


Syracuse

Bleacher Report #21


 

 

 

 

 


There are a million different (well, lots of) ways to do your schedule poster. Some schools prefer a uniform look with the same design for multiple sports. Others want a different, unique identity for each sport. To show our skills and demonstrate this point, here are several examples of Old Hat designs using fall sports other than football.

 

The article I posted earlier in the week has caused some negative, yet understandable feedback. It comes as no surprise to me that some feathers were ruffled by the solution I proposed to the new Federal Labor Standards Act. Below is an expanded version of a response I posted to a comment on the original blog post.

I would like to reiterate what I stated in the article which is that, "If you love your current creative staff or freelancer, don’t fire them just because you can’t afford to pay them enough to meet all your needs." The idea that we are advocating widespread layoffs leaves me wondering if people actually read the article or just the headline. I clearly stated that I do not feel changes should be made if an athletic department has a good creative staff in place. 

What some people may not realize is that I was once on an internal creative staff myself. And if I felt that someone were advocating that I get fired, I'd be quite upset. However, the FLSA rules are estimated to have a $1.5 million impact to the average mid-major athletic department. While some can absorb that, others will have to make cuts. That's just the reality of the situation. I would love to think that rather than cutting anyone, departments would increase everyone's wage to the new threshold. I just don't believe that's realistic. Departments will have a greater need than ever to get fans in seats to increase revenue and honestly, I've never seen a situation in which using Old Hat wouldn't save an athletic department vast sums of money over having in-house creative. I've run the numbers many times and the fact of the matter is, a department could save themselves thousands of dollars annually by using Old Hat for their high level creative rather than an in-house crew. 

We can't forget that the mission of an athletic department is anything other than educating the student-athlete and giving the opportunity to as many young people as possible to compete and get an education. The FLSA rules are going to have a major impact whether we like it or not. We are simply recommending an option that will help contribute to a department's ability to continue that mission.

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