Big changes to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) will take effect on December 1, 2016. That means you have the first half of the school year to: (a) get as much overtime out of your current employees as possible while you still can, and (b) figure out how the heck you’re going to make things work when the new rules go into effect. 

Here’s the issue in a nutshell: you won’t be able to afford to keep doing things the way you do them today. 

We all know that there’s no such thing as a 40 hour workweek for employees in collegiate athletics. Especially not for employees at the lower end of the pay scale. Right now, you don’t have to pay overtime rates to professional, administrative or executive employees whose salaries are $23,660 per year or more. But come December, that threshold jumps to $47,476 per year. So here’s the question: can you survive without all the overtime hours your lower-paid employees currently work, or can you afford to pay them a lot more in the future? 

It’s not like you have a bunch of extra money laying around. And if you’re a Division I school, you may already in a budget crunch thanks to recent changes related to food service and scholarship rules.

Unfortunately, your practices, games, and related activities are not going to magically start fitting into a tidy little 40 hour workweek…no matter how many of you write letters to Santa. 

Something’s gotta give.

Here’s our advice: cut your creative staff.

Yep. You heard that right. 

Drastic times call for drastic measures. 

So yeah. Your graphic designer. Your video production specialist. Send’em packing.

We’re not saying you don’t need marketing support. Of course you do! It’s just that you don’t need to keep those individuals on your staff as yet another piece of your salary and overtime puzzle. And even if your marketing team isn’t working overtime, we all know they’re still a likely target when budget cuts come around.

The way we see it, you’ve got 3 alternatives to consider.

#1 – Hire Freelancers

If you’ve never tried it before, this might sound like a good idea. But most of you who have been around the block once or twice are cringing right now. Most athletic departments haven’t had a lot of luck with freelancers providing consistently high-quality work that’s on time and on target. Unless you have a freelancer who has worked with you before or who came from the collegiate athletics marketing industry, you’ll probably find they lack the expertise and insight you’re looking for. On the other hand, if you’re lucky enough to have found a really great freelancer, that person is probably working a lot more than 40 hours for you at an annual salary that’s lower than the new FLSA threshold…which means in December, you’ll have the same problem with your freelance rock star as you would with your own in-house staff.

#2 – Two Words: Student Internship

Hey, look around. In your neighborhood, there’s no shortage of young soon-to-be-professionals eager to build their resumes and score some real-world experience. And most of them don’t want to work anywhere close to 40 hours a week anyway. Assembling a low-cost creative staff will be like shooting fish in a barrel! What could possibly go wrong? Well, other than lack of experience, inconsistency, the need for a lot of oversight, not having any of the aforementioned industry expertise, some pesky rules or limitations… Reality check: you get what you pay for. There’s a reason you haven’t relied on this type of manpower to serve as your creative staff before. Sure, you may have some top-notch students who help you out from time to time, and that’s great. But as a year-over-year strategy, trying to rely on them to fill the gap FLSA is about to create won’t earn you a barrel of Gatorade over the head.

#3 – Outsource It

If only you knew somebody with a wealth of industry experience, mad design skills, a deep bench of talent, and serious strategic chops that you could hire and rely on without having to even think about overtime or paying a higher salary. Oh, wait. You do. All joking aside, Old Hat can provide everything you need from a creative standpoint. From design to video production, project management, strategic planning and copywriting, we offer a full range of creative services. We’re good enough, we’re smart enough, and doggone it, people like us. If you don’t have your dream team in place right now, take them off your payroll and let us be your creative staff instead. Want to have a designer right there on campus with you? No problem – we can be the one to hire them, pay them, and worry about their hours, plus we’ve got the capacity to absorb any excess work. 

Or don’t cut your creative staff. Augment them the smart way.

If you love your current creative staff or freelancer, don’t fire them just because you can’t afford to pay them enough to meet all your needs. I mean, really. Do we come across as that callous or short-sighted? (For the record, we’re neither.) Instead, let us augment your team and handle all those extra hours you can’t afford to pay them for. Old Hat can provide you subscription-style creative support that will cost you a lot less in the long run than paying overtime rates or higher salaries, while delivering the highest quality results. We’ll work with you to come up with a plan that gives you all services you need, when you need them. We’ll even dedicate somebody to becoming your brand expert. Everybody wins! Want to talk it over? Give us a call.

 

One of my favorite things about the Olympics are the advertisements during and leading up to the Games. Yeah, I said it. I LOVE COMMERCIALS. I know there have been a lot of complaints about the volume of spots during the Opening Ceremonies as well as the Prime Time broadcasts, but I tend to agree with the notion that folks are just becoming more intolerant. The numbers for the Opening Ceremonies actually dropped compared to the 2012 London Games. While I get that these interruptions can be annoying, it's not like we're getting the local auto dealership and mesothelioma lawsuit ads. Every two years the very best in athletic competition is complemented with the very best in advertising. I'll be totally okay taking a 4.5 minute break every 15 minutes if the product remains as entertaining and inspirational as the events themselves.

Here are some of my personal favorites:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old Hat just recently completed video shoots for The University of Illinois' football and men's basketball teams. We were very excited to once again head out to Champaign and work with the Illini marketing staff and their respective student-athletes on a unique video concept. 

When we started talking with Illinois about these shoots we wanted to find a way to show their student-athletes and the familiar concepts of a football and men's basketball shoot in a different way. We settled on stop-motion as the method of telling our story. 

A stop-motion video is simply a series of still photographs played back at the speed of video which is typically 24 frames per second. That means for every second of video we show on-screen we shot 24 photographs to make that moment come alive. 

Let's get to a few of the technical challenges with this video. It was shot with a Canon 7D Mark II, which shoots stills at a maximum frame rate of 10 fps. Obviously this isn't quite up to the speed of 24 fps of shooting video, so you get a unique staccato, strobe-y feel to the video. The 7D is great because it's basically the poor man's sports shooter.  Just as many frames for way less than their flagship cameras. 

 

In the photo above you can see the 7D Mark II sitting atop a Glidecam 4000 on a steadicam arm. One of the things we wanted to do on these shoots was to really move the camera around like we would a video camera, even though we were shooting stills. Shooting with a steadicam allowed us to achieve that look. 

Here's a reverse angle of a slightly different setup. You can see that two strobes are on stands and the larger octabank is being handheld by light-holder extraordinaire Brad Wurthman, who also happens to be in charge of marketing at Illinois. In several other setups and throughout the day we had a person holding each individual light stand to facilitate movement of the camera and all of the lights simultaneously. 

We shot with Profoto B1 strobes. The B1's are battery powered and gave us the ability to move around quickly without having to worry about extension cords and finding power. We could go anywhere and continue to light our subjects. User replaceable batteries meant we could have backups charged and ready to go whenever we were running low. All in all we shot over 8,000 photographs between football and men's basketball, which is a lot of flashes. 

Stay tuned for the football video to make its debut in the coming weeks!

 

Have you ever had that moment where you look at another program’s website, schedule poster, or other promotional materials and say to yourself: “Man! That’s so cool. I want exactly the same thing – except in my school’s colors.”

Of course you have. We’ve all been there. That moment of marketing envy happens all the time. And that’s ok, because last time I checked there wasn’t a commandment that said “Thou shalt not covet they neighbor’s marketing.”

And besides, you know what they say: imitation is the highest form of flattery. I don’t know who “they” are, but that’s what my mother always told me when I whined about my big brother mimicking me. (Side note: I’m 99.99% sure he wasn’t doing it to flatter me, and hearing mom’s explanation always made me want to kick “they” in the shins. My brother usually got it in the shins instead.)

Most of the time, if you try to copy what somebody else is doing, they’ll take it as a sign they’re doing something right.

But here’s the rub: sometimes other people’s stuff just doesn’t fit you.

It’s like that time in middle school where you went out and bought something the most popular kid had, only to find that it looked kind of ridiculous on you.

Or that time when you really admired somebody else’s style (maybe their leadership style, their lifestyle, their hairstyle, their style of speaking… you get the idea), but when you tried to do things exactly the way they did, something wasn’t quite right.

Here’s another way to think of it. Wind back the clock to when you were in school. You had to write a paper about something. You found some really good information, copied it exactly, and turned it in. That’s called plagiarism. You got an F. You wrote another paper, but this time you kind of reworded things instead of copying them directly. You got a C, because it was pretty solid work but not very original. Then you wrote a paper where you used great information as a springboard for your own ideas instead. You crushed it and brought home the A. Yay, you! (Even if your actual experience didn’t quite happen that way, you get the point.)

When you copy somebody else, you’re not being your most genuine self. Even if others don’t see through it (which – trust me – they will sooner or later), whatever you’re doing won’t be nearly as effective as if you had done things your own way.

The same goes for marketing.

Sure, you can copy what somebody else is doing and just make it look like your own. And it might work out pretty well for you, at least for a little while. But it will never work as well as taking the time to create something that’s based on a deep understanding of who you are, what you offer, who you’re trying to engage, and the compelling reasons for your target audience to do what you’re asking them to do.

So the next time you see somebody else doing something cool, admire it. Get inspired by it. Then ask yourself why it works so well for that other brand. Think about the unique attributes, challenges, and opportunities of your own program and how you can use that understanding to come up with something that’s even better – for you.

Because once you start thinking that way, you’re moving from a marketing plan based on “I think” to a strategic approach based on “I know.” That’s when results happen.

Besides, wouldn’t you rather be the one who’s getting copied instead of the copycat?

Blog Assignment: Concepting client videos - what is your process.

Current Creative State of Mind:

Confession:

I hit a creative block this week. It's one of the awesome realities you face when your job is to be creative. There's no rhyme or reason. In fact, the day before it struck I drove home feeling really good about the creative work I put in. 16 hours later IT'S GONE. To be honest, it's infuriating. What changed between today and yesterday?? No idea, but now everything is a struggle. Writing this blog is a struggle. FINDING THE PERFECT GIF IS A STRUGGLE.

Struggle struggle struggle.

 

I'm sure this kind of honesty isn't exactly what they had in mind when assigning me this blog topic, but I'm also pretty sure every single person who creates anything deals with this problem. It's a little paralyzing especially when most days it comes so easy. So you find yourself filling part your day with tasks that don't require a whole lot of thought, but provide very little satisfaction. The other part of the day you stare at a blank piece of paper. You write the same voice over lines over and over again thinking maybe if you write it one more time it will finally sound good in your head. You play the Intro music with the footage from the video shoot and read the VO lines in your head. You play Heart really loudly in your ear buds hoping Ann Wilson's voice will drown out the office din, but then get distracted by their version of "Stairway to Heaven." Maybe I do like that song? NO. I do not. Play "These Dreams" again.

Sooner or later everything leads to this:

The good news is this isn't a permanent condition. It's not the first time I've hit a creative wall and it won't be the last time. Thankfully, I have several boards on Pinterest to help drag me out of the creative void. THIS is typically where my creative concepting process begins. Looking at other people's creative work helps motivate that hamster in my head to get back on the wheel. It doesn't take much to get inspired. It could be a concept, a song, a design, writing, a camera angle, etc. I just have to put in the work to find it. 

Concepting isn't just on the creative person though. It helps when, for example, your client brings some ideas to the table. Simple lines like "Hail to the Orange" , "Texas Tough" or "Bring the Fight" actually help me conjur up several visuals like iconic campus settings, skylines, time lapses, groups of people and voice overs. From there I start researching ways to visually bring the lines to life. I ask a lot of internal questions: How have other people done it? Was it successful? How could we do it better? Could this work in a sports setting?

I spend a lot of time gathering pictures, videos, and music examples for a poor man's storyboard. And I might even write a rough voice over. There are several other things specific to each client, sport and team that have to be taken into account when concepting and I discussed all of that in length here.

If there's time and I have the assets I'll create a rough video edit to see how everything works together. Once I think I'm onto something I like to run it by another video creative person like a Dustin. Finally, if we're all on board then I'll hand it on over to the Geppetto's downstairs who will make the concept come to life. 

It's all pretty magical once you get past the creative block. I guess if you really think about it the block is a necessary part of the creative process. And there's my Doogie Howser, M.D blog conclusion.

Repeat after us: video is your friend.

You already know that video lets you reach your fans in a way that’s exciting and memorable. But did you know that video play on smartphones and tablets has grown 116% every year since 2011? Current statistics show that about 70% of Americans watch short-form videos daily on their smartphone, with the youngest group of viewers (your current and future students) watching twice as many videos on mobile as any other group.

And it’s not like people are just out there watching cat videos (well, some are… but you can’t help those people, so don’t even try). In the sports world, we naturally have the kind of content that people of all ages want to watch. According to YouTube data, a whole lot of people are watching sports-related videos before, during, and after sports events. As in: 57% of YouTube sports viewers said they watch related video content before a sports event and 60% say YouTube is one of the first places they go after major sports events or news.

What are they watching? A fair amount of it is how-to, demo, and product videos - but not all of it.

They’re also watching insider content they can’t get anywhere else, game highlights and replays, and videos that help them connect to their favorite teams and players in unique ways. You just happen to have about a gazillion micro-moments that fit this description, so why not make good use of them?

If you want to get fans excited about coming to your games or make them feel like they’re missing out if they aren’t there in person, it’s time to develop a deliberate video strategy. Identify your goals, do some research and ask your fans what makes them tick, and make a plan to consistently capture and share videos that scratch that itch. For some of it, you’ll want professional quality shooting and production (by the way, we do that really well). For other parts of your video plan, you’ll want to take a more casual, as-it-happens approach. And it’s not a bad idea to consider building in opportunities for fans and players to submit their own videos as part of a deliberate collection and sharing effort.

Video is one of the most powerful and shareable tactics in your marketing playbook. So use it. We can help.

Congrats on making it to June!! You finally might get to take that hard earned vacation (this is an accurate depiction of me on vaca right this blog moment)! Rest up because we're less than 80 days until the college football kickoff. To help ensure relaxation you can rest easy knowing our designers haven't been resting at all. Check out some of our newest design concepts to add to your video gameday toolbox.

Match-up animations are an absolute MUST-HAVE for every gameday video board AND television presentation.

We're pretty excited about the possibility of incorporating these comic book video effects for Intros, Commercials and even Player Features (an earlier version of this concept included underoos and a cape).

 

We also have some new video effects that will definitely add some visual variety to your standard text point graphic.

Need more proof that we've been busy little bees??

Exhibit A:

 

Exhibit B:

Last Monday I posted an article about the death of the schedule poster as we know it and talked about the need to breathe life back into it through treating it more like an advertisement than an informational tool. Simply informing people of when the games will be played and scattering athlete photos around an 18 x 24" space doesn't do much to actually drive attendance anymore. It needs to be a part of a grander marketing campaign.

So that begs the question: How do we do that?

Answer: Through a research & discovery, internal & external surveys, target audience indentification, strategic messaging, media audits and brilliant creative.

Sounds difficult and daunting, doesn't it? Well, it's not. It's time-consuming and requires expertise in all of these fields. It involves large groups of people working together to provide feedback and input. It requires everyone in an organization buying in to a common goal. But fortunately, Old Hat has the tools and processes in place to facilitate all of it. It's called the Sports180° Process and is our proven, research-based process that gets to the heart of your unique position. Through this approach, we help you clarify objectives, analyze your playing field, and develop a winning strategy.

We just completed the initial phases of the Sports180° with SMU and are entering implementation phase where we will launch an internal and external marketing campaign, a ticket sales website and multiple gameday experience pieces that are united under a common message and goal.

Phase 1: Scouting

The first step in the process is research and discovery. Understanding your internal culture and inspiring your staff can prevent disconnects between your brand promise and what your fans experience. Their weigh-in will produce buy-in.  We talk to Senior Athletic Department Staff, Individual Department Team Members, Development, Marketing, Ticket Sales, Sponsorship and Support Staff as Directed (Team Operations, Coaches, Game Operations, Designers, Interns, Game Day Contractors, Facility Staff, Merchandise, etc.)

There are other key groups that play a role in the success of your brand, so we meet with a few representatives or request their participation in your survey. This may include groups like Fundraising Club Members, Alumni, Students, Community Influencers, Individual Game Buyers, Premium Customers, etc.

By the end of this phase we’ll understand both your market and your uniquely compelling story, as told straight from the horse’s mouth.


Discovery process on campus at SMU

Phase 2: Playbook

In phase two we analyze the research and develop a playbook to achieve your objectives. This phase involves refining your leadership vision, identifying sales and marketing opportunities, aligning your target audiences with your brand differentiators, and assessing how you can win against your competitors.

Leadership Vision: Review and discussion of the vision shared by your organization’s key leaders.

Research Findings: Presentation of comprehensive research findings and analysis, including key takeaways and opportunities.

Audience Alignment: Development and presentation of profile personas for key current and desired target audiences.

Marketing Opportunities: Identification of opportunities that support your vision, engage your key audiences, and position you for greater success.

Examples of Findings:

 Phase 3: Game Day

Incorporating your feedback and our research findings, this is where we execute our recommendations and begin to engage with your fans, alumni and donors. We will present a set of campaign platforms that demonstrate how you will connect with your key stakeholders. You’ll also receive comprehensive reports with our research findings and strategic recommendations plus a detailed brand launch marketing plan.

Key Components

Strategic Recommendations: Summary of insights and recommended actions.

Brand Platform: Presentation of final creative look, feel, and messaging as a springboard for future tactical elements.

Marketing Communications Plan: Marketing campaign launch plan, including recommended tactics, message channels, delivery, and timing. 

Brand Style Guide: Written brand style guide detailing fonts, colors, photo types, brand language and more for internal use in execution. Provided following final approval of brand platform.



The SMU Sports180° is complete and the creative elements will begin to see the light of day in the coming weeks. Through our research, we were able to identify what their most important needs were and how to properly address those needs. Portions of the Sports180° process were also used in the Raise Up Carolina project where we conducted research to identify what was unique about football game days in Chapel Hill and built a site around that position that was targeted at the proper audience. 

A brilliant marketing campaign targeted at the wrong audience will produce no better results than a terrible campaign targeted at the right audience. Old Hat has the proper experience, tools and processes that allow us to both identify and target the proper audience and build the creative that will reach them.

The mission of most collegiate athletic departments surround the idea of developing the student-athlete. And we know that's impossible without the financial support that comes from having fans in the stands. Old Hat's mission is to increase attendance at sporting events. Plain and simple. Together, and using this process, Old Hat can achieve our mission while helping you achieve yours.

A few years ago, an acquaintance of mine decided he was going to start a sports apparel company. Like most new businesses, he was starting with nothing. He had no facility, he had no customers, he had no product. He just had an idea. 

Oh, and he had one more thing. He applied to a program through the SBA that provided him with a steady stream of potential customers with built in brand loyalty to his new company. He didn't have to do a single thing to create that brand loyalty. This program was revolutionary. The government would take large groups of young people and spend four years slowly building an affinity within them for this guy's brand. They'd give these kids free product, they'd surround them with this company's logo and they'd teach these impressionable young minds songs that furthered a love for this guy's company. And every year, after spending four years instilling passion within these potential customers, the program would release thousands of them into the world where they would make more money than nearly half of the population.

Needless to say, my friend's company was set up to be a smashing success. Every year from the start of his company until the end of time, he had 5,000+ people who automatically loved his brand. All he had to do was supply them with a good product. Some of these people were more passionate than others, of course. And he couldn't retain them all. But what he found was that for the rest of these people's lives, they had at least some affinity for his product. On top of that, their ability to afford his product was better than average. So of course he was incredibly successful…how could he not be?

Apply Here

What was the name of this company? It doesn't matter because I made it all up. That is, I made up the idea that this was someone's company that couldn’t help but succeed. The rest of it happens every year at hundreds of organizations.

On average, about 1.8 million people receive bachelor's degrees from colleges and universities in the United States. The vast majority spent about four years being surrounded by that university's brand every single day. They walked past hundreds of signs, pole banners and trash cans all bearing that institution's logo. They sat next to thousands of other students wearing t-shirts with that university's brand across the front. They were taught the history of their school, songs they will never forget, and traditions that reinforced their love for their school. And then, after four years of this indoctrination, they are released into the world with the ability to earn an average of $18,000 more per year than those who did not attend college.

Can you imagine what Nike would do for that kind of exposure? What do you think Nike would pay to have their logo on every banner, trash can, building and sign on a college campus? The value of that level of exposure to a brand is incalculable. As a business owner I can tell you that I would have killed to have been able to start my business with a group of customers that already loved my company.

Spoiled Sports

Those of us who work in collegiate athletics are spoiled. We’re playing with a stacked deck and we’re still losing. We have something Nike would pay millions of dollars for and that businesses everywhere dream about. I've used the number 5,000 in talking about the number of graduates that come out of a university each year. Some are less, obviously. But some have double or triple that number. The point is that collegiate athletics departments have four years of free marketing opportunities handed to them on a silver platter, and there are thousands of people graduating from universities every year who have will have some level of affinity for their alma mater for the rest of their lives.

No other industry in the world has this advantage. No one ever says, "Well, I wear Adidas because my grandpa wore Adidas and my dad wore Adidas." Even professional sports teams have less of an automatic fan base and less built-in loyalty than collegiate athletics. 

If you have empty seats at your stadium or arena, you have no excuse. Or at least you don't have nearly the excuse that organizations in every other industry has if they're failing to bring in customers. If alumni aren’t coming back to support your athletic program, it’s because the product you’re asking them to support isn't good enough.

Winning Isn't Everything

The argument can be made that fans would come if the team would win and that as marketers, we can't control the product on the field. But the decrease in attendance among collegiate athletics isn't isolated to losing programs. Winning teams are losing fans too. The product on the field is great but fans are still choosing to stay home.

At home, the beer is cheaper, the couch is more comfy and the temperature is always a nice 72 degrees. That’s hard to compete with, but not impossible. Because we do have an advantage: they already love us. They spent four years seeing our logo, wearing our clothes and singing our songs. 

We might not be able to control the product on the field, but there’s a lot more to the home-or-stadium decision than that. We can control ticket prices. We can control advertising. We can control strategically targeting the fans most likely to attend and understanding what makes them tick. And we can control the gameday experience. 

So what about my theoretical friend and his theoretical business? Was success really that easy for him? Of course not. He had to work at it. He had to realize that he couldn’t rely on the same old tricks to get fans to the stadium. He had to stop taking his steady stream of brand loyalists and their disposable income for granted, and start doing more to give them a product that is better than staying home. That was when he started succeeding. And if he didn’t do those things and ended up failing even when the deck was stacked in his favor, then he had nobody to blame but himself.

Mister Speaker, Mister Vice President, Members of Congress, my fellow Americans,

Today marks another spring that I've come to report on the State of Productions at Old Hat. And for this one, I’m going to try to make it a little shorter. (Applause.) I know some of you are antsy to get back to Iowa. (Laughter.)

See I knew copying the actual State of the Union could only take me so far in this entry. (Laughter.) Instead, let me present to you a reel of some of our best work from 2015-16 (Applause.):

Luckily for me, all of the really hard work was already done by our production team. They make amazing creative with often impossible deadlines. It has become so old hat, if you will, it's easy to forget the amount effort that goes into it. Go team! The challenging part of this process was picking the projects to include for a one-minute reel. If the criteria for making it into the reel was "cool stuff" well then we'd have a ten-minute video. And who has time for that when there are obviously more important things to do?

I like to make sure to include all of the various services we offer: Intro/Hype Videos, Historical Videos, Commercials, 3D Logo Animations, TV/Video Board Graphics Packages, Fan Entertainment Games, Player Features, On-Location Shoots, Crowd Prompts, Sponsor/Promotional Animations and Court Projection Mapping. That's a lot of stuff to be awesome at.

A common look that everybody was doing last year was the highlight imagery within the player. A lot of organizations did a solid job of utilizing that look. I think the two biggest songs from 2015-16 were Nina Simone's "Feeling Good" (I think we can all thank Auburn Basketball 2014-15 for that one) and The Fugees "Ready or Not" from the Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation trailer. I suspect a few football programs will probably use those songs for this upcoming 2016 season. 

Our goals for 2016-17 will be to continue to push our designs, our shoot and video concepts, and our writing. Gotta stay ahead of the pack. This is what we're doing right now during our spring months: Laying the foundation for the fall. You don't just go out and run a marathon. You have to train for it months ahead of time. That's how our creative works. We're spending hundreds of hours researching design, concepts, and music so that when all of the fall projects start pouring in we're ready to roll and the creative doesn't suffer.

One tool to help with our creative goals is a new video questionairre designed to help us understand your team(s) better and deliver super-ridiculously-awesome videos. It includes questions about department goals, things to improve on this year, favorite videos from last season, and any special landmarks, quotes or stories that could help make your video unique. While direction such as "make it cool" is encouraging, it's our aim to be an even more integral part of your team and know everything about you. We're your number one fan. Sort of like Kathy Bates in Misery.

And that’s why I stand here confident as I have ever been that the State of Productions is strong. (Applause.)

(Laughter.)

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Productions