January has already come and gone! Can you believe it? As we finish up materials for spring sports it means that football season is RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER! The past couple of weeks conferences have released their schedules and I can already feel the excitement for the 2017 season. If you start planning ahead there might be some special things you can do to create even cooler materials for your fans! 

Specialty printing

Haven’t set the budget for 2017 season yet? Put some extra money in your budget for your football poster and we can do some special printing techniques. You can do a cool die cut, make your poster shine, or even give it a funky texture. Not sure if your printer can handle any of that—contact one of our client reps and we can get you a quote from a TRUSTED printer! 

Social Media

Now that Instagram has stories and Snapchat is one of the leading apps for the kids, you can promote your games, schedules, athletes and fans in a multitude of creative ways. Start thinking about different utilizations of those features to get information in front of your fans

Tickets

Tickets are often the first project we do for football season, but maybe it's early and you don’t have a concept or direction you want to go? Don’t worry! We can help! Think about using past athletes on tickets if you don’t know who is going to be a star yet. Or just let us feature your brand and opponents and we’ll come up with something stellar. Tickets are another great piece you can use specialty printing on. 

Marketing Materials

If you have a spring game coming up and the temperature is hot in your city think of a different type of item to use to promote the upcoming season. Maybe a fan? Anything YOU can think of WE can design. 

Billboards

Billboards can be used very creatively. They can have extensions or holes in them to create a larger-than-life message. Think about a crazy way to get drivers' attentions and promote your brand!

Start planning and budgeting for football now and let us help you create some incredible materials for 2017! Email us if you need anything! 

There are a handful of people who make your job never feel like a job. They challenge you to do your best work and they trust you to accomplish that feat. It is truly a pleasure working with them. I can say without a doubt that Brad Wurthman, Associate Director of Athletics, Marketing/Fan Development at the University of Illinois, is one of those people. He started working with Old Hat in 2011 while at the University of Cincinnati. Brad's very first project was this Bearcats Football Black Out game poster.

Everybody loved The Dark Knight theme in 2011!

His first video with us happened in 2012 and we've been fortunate to work with "America's Favorite Canadian Ginger" ever since. Some of my absolute favorite projects have been Wurthman's.

So what's the real story with this guy? We asked him 20 Questions to find out. Feel free to add your own Canadian accent when reading this.

1. NAME: Brad Wurthman

2. OCCUPATION/TITLE: Associate Director of Athletics, Marketing/Fan Development

3. HOMETOWN: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

4. PREGAME RITUAL: Gum. Lots of gum. Specifically bubble gum. Plus trash talking. Other than that, I normally try to find about a 2 minute window where I’m completely on my own to just take a look at all of the work that has gone into preparing for our game and the people who worked on it to enjoy that feeling of accomplishment.

5. FAVORITE THING TO SNACK ON: Cookies. Is that a snack? If not, it would still win. I’d still pick cookies even if I wasn’t allowed to.

6. FAVORITE THING ABOUT YOUR JOB: Having the opportunity to be part of a team that can make an immediate impact on something that people are emotionally invested in. There’s a reason I want to sell sports and not something else.

7. LEAST FAVORITE THING ABOUT YOUR JOB: Since everyone can be involved in everything at times, progress can be slowed for certain projects – just have to keep your wits about you and commit to finding the best solution possible.

8. HIDDEN TALENTS/HOBBIES: Drawing/Illustration, Snowboarding, Baking

9. ADVICE TO YOUR YOUNGER SELF: Breathe. Take a moment to do the things that are important to you for personal reasons and not just for professional reasons. Set boundaries and stick to them – without compromising your ambition. Focus on learning, not only on progressing. Most importantly, always leave the blackjack table when you have more money than you arrived with.

10. YOUR GO-TO KARAOKE SONG: I think everyone has to have a three song rotation, unless you’re talented enough to audition for The Voice. Karaoke is not about my voice – it’s about crowd interaction. So, in very specific order…Don’t Stop Believing by Journey, Friends in Low Places by Garth Brooks, Hero by Enrique Iglesias.

11. FAVORITE MOVIE: Jurassic Park

12. FAVORITE TV SHOW: House of Cards

13. IF YOU WERE IN A BOY BAND WHAT WOULD IT BE CALLED: Who says I wasn’t? The Eh Team.

14. FAVORITE PLACE TO EAT: Smoke’s Poutinerie

15. WHAT DO YOU ORDER THERE: Montreal style smoked meat poutine

16. FAVORITE DISNEY PRINCESS: No contest. Ariel. Gingers have to stick together.

17. WHAT’S YOUR SPIRIT ANIMAL: I took two quizzes to answer this question. One said lion, one said llama. So, take that for what it’s worth.

18. WHAT’S THE STUPIDEST THING YOU’VE EVER DONE: All in a matter of about 2 weeks, I committed to go on a 3 week trip to China after graduating college. Though it turned out to be one of the best experiences of my life, I had no actual idea what I was signing up for at the time and it didn’t actually hit me until I was staring down at the center of the Pacific Ocean. Sometimes, not thinking about the end result leads to you to make the best decisions!

19. WHAT’S THE LAST SHOW THAT YOU BINGE-WATCHED: Narcos.

20. IF YOU WEREN’T DOING THIS JOB WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING: I grew up in a family of teachers and really believe in the power of education – but was not blessed with the same patience gene for rooms of 30 children so that was never going to work. However, I’d love to teach snowboarding and live in Western Canada at one of the resorts – it’s so much fun to watch someone experience their first linked turn because it’s a very individual sport – either you commit to it and fight through it or you don’t. I’m a sucker for a good story about overcoming challenges.

We’ve been busy worker bees at Old Hat this past year! Our designers have been trying out new techniques, skills, and as always-knocking things out of the park! Here are some of our favorites from 2016. 

This poster was cutout in the shape of a boat, with some special printing techniques where you see the pink. 

 

Gold Medal Work right here! 

Was this poster done with some lightning bugs? Maybe..we'll never tell. 

This poster is off the grid..or court. 

So much greatness packed into one poster! Look at those UTES! 

If this doesn't get you excited for some Frank Martin basketball, I don't know what will. 

Were YOU There for gameday? 

These guys and gals are running all over Texas! 

USA Softball is back! 

To see more, look for #OH16Review on our instagram

 

 

Let's be honest, in athletics, there's a ton of information that needs to be communicated to your fans and a multitude of platforms to do it. We're talking hundreds of games, events, and student athletes each year. And you need to cover your social media bases with Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, Gryzzl, etc, etc. That's an overwhelming and time-consuming amount of work. In addition to that, most schools don't have the luxury of having one person responsible for all of their many accounts. So, in order to make sure you have a cohesive brand look across multiple accounts, it's best to have some assistance. If only there was some sort of tool to help you out?

We partnered with several schools to create social media template packages tailored to each of their needs. This gives each school a cohesive library of templates created specifically for them. A few examples include:

  • Gameday Graphics
  • Final Score Graphics
  • Player of the Game/Week
  • Player / Coach / Team Awards
  • Starting Lineups
  • Player Stats
  • Holidays

These templates enable each school's marketing and sports information departments to update text, photos, logos, and other elements within each template so that they can post information quickly across many sports. They can also be sized to work across multiple platforms so that the messaging looks the same on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, the official athletic website and more. Additionally, all of the templates are created to complement each other, so the information being posted across the athletic department looks clean, polished, consistent, and most of all -  ON BRAND

Check out how some of our partners at Duke, Pitt, Marist and FIU are all using the custom templates that we created for each of them....

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Give us a call to learn more about how we can help bring your brand together online and create tailored graphic templates for you!

 

 

 

 

At the 2016 NACMA Conference, Old Hat lead a presentation on marketing automation. We highlighted the success of RaiseUpCarolina.com, a ticket sales website built for UNC that has helped increase ticket sales revenue by more than $500,000 and aided in selling out their premium seating areas for the first time ever. Marketing automation is one of the tools we used as a part of that project. We took a uniquely positioned website with a great user experience that built excitement for a specific program and turned it into a ridiculously effective sales tool.

A lot of people think of marketing automation as a ticket sales tool, in and of itself. I disagree. I don't think of marketing automation as a tool any more than I think of the handle of a hammer as a tool. The handle of a hammer is only effective if it has the head and/or claw of the hammer. Without one or both of those, it's completely ineffective in achieving its goal. Marketing automation is no different. Without combining marketing automation with other elements to drive results, you're stuck with something as ineffective as the handle of a hammer would be in driving nails.

Some ticketing companies are starting to offer marketing automation as a part of their platform. First, fans visit a school's primary athletic website, navigate to the ticket portal and then their activity is logged and put into the automation system. That information is segmented into audiences and communicated based on their interest on the site. However, there's one major problem with this approach: It's predicated on the idea that people are already interested in coming to those events. If they already want to come, attendance wouldn't be an issue in the first place. 

Think about it this way: using marketing automation on a ticket portal through a primary athletic website (goheels.com, for instance) is like putting a ticket sales phone number on a blank, white piece of paper and posting it on a telephone pole on a street corner. It's boring, uninviting, really hard to find and once you do find it, it does nothing to actually make you want to attend the event.

Marketing automation is an amazing way to help increase ticket sales and attendance, but tracking fans' activity on a ticket portal that no one is coming to doesn't take advantage of the power of marketing automation. If no one is coming to your ticket purchasing pages, you're not going to have anyone to track. 

Marketing automation is simply a piece of a ticket sales tool. And here are the three things that render it completely ineffective.

1. Dedicated Ticket Sales Site

Again, the problem isn't that people don't know when/where the games are. The problem is that they don't want to come. Simply providing information is not enough. You have to create an interface that builds excitement. Look at your primary website real quick, select any sport, click to purchase tickets and determine if there's anything about that page that actually makes you excited about that sport. If the answer is yes, you're a step ahead, but you're still faced with the issue of forcing people to have to navigate through information about 25 other sports before they find the one they want to buy tickets for. There's a reason the producers of The Avengers built a website just to build excitement about that movie rather than just making it one of many options to look at on the production company's website. And there's a reason that every other major movie does the same thing. Using your primary athletic site to drive ticket sales is a mistake.

2. Off-Season Marketing Campaign

Most of the time, the marketing that takes place for a specific sport happens in the weeks leading up to the start of the season. It will typically continue through the season, but once the season ends, the marketing ends. Sure we send out ticket renewal letters and other information, but most of the time we cease to continue to make them excited about that sport. What we should be doing is actually ramping up our marketing efforts as the season comes to a close and keeping those marketing efforts going the entire off-season. One of the reasons RaiseUpCarolina.com was so successful is because it launched right at the end of the football season. Then, throughout the winter and spring, we were consistently pushing people to that site through a comprehensive marketing campaign. Because we were continually driving traffic to the site, marketing automation was able to do what marketing automation does. If you're not continually driving traffic to your site, you're not getting the most bang for your buck in what you're spending on marketing automation.

3. Digital Marketing Strategy

As discussed, marketing automation is only one part of a much larger puzzle. It is a force multiplier, much like the handle of a hammer. A hammer's head will drive a nail if you hit it hard enough. Add a handle to that head and it amplifies the force exponentially and makes driving that nail a lot easier. Marketing automation is the piece of the tool that makes your efforts exponentially more effective in driving ticket sales. What can make marketing automation even more effective? Other digital strategies that augment marketing automation. One example is geofencing. We can identify an area where you have a potential base of ticket purchasers and target them by geofencing that area and serving them digital advertising through whatever site or app they spend most of their time on. For instance, let's say you have a loyal and passionate fanbase at your basketball games, but those fans aren't coming to your football games. We geofence your basketball arena and all your fans have to do is use their phone to access the web in any way during that event. Once they do, we can then serve them ads on Facebook, Google, etc. to drive them to purchase. These ads will push them to your website where they then enter your marketing automation platform and now you're hitting them from all angles.

 

There's no question that marketing automation is powerful. A $500,000 increase in ticket sales at UNC is enough to prove that point, but it took a lot more than marketing automation to make that happen: A good program, a great marketing staff, a ticket sales team, a dedicated ticket sales website, an off-season marketing campaign and marketing automation. This season we'll be implementing a comprehensive digital marketing strategy including geofencing and hope to add yet another force multiplier to the ticket sales effort.

EUGENE, OR - University of Oregon Athletic Department officials announced Wednesday that they have ended their long-standing relationship with Nike and have signed with Walmart's Avia brand to provide all athletic apparel and shoes. 

"We appreciate everything Nike and Phil Knight have done for the University of Oregon and respect the organization immensely. However, we feel that it is time for a new era in Oregon Athletics and we are confident that Walmart is the right organization to represent the Oregon brand," one official stated.


Okay, did anyone believe that for one second? Did anyone truly believe that Oregon, a major collegiate athletic program, would drop Nike in favor of Walmart? Of course not. 

But why?

A lot of reasons, most likely. For one, Nike and Phil Knight have given so much support to the University of Oregon, they'd never dream of going with any other apparel company, much less Walmart's Avia brand. But let's swap out Oregon, and let's say Michigan instead. Or Bowling Green. Or UConn. Or East Popcorn State University. Would you have believed the headline then?

East Popcorn State drops Adidas; Walmart's Avia to provide Colonels Team Apparel

 

Would that headline be any more believable? Probably not. 

But why?

Avia makes fine apparel. I have a pair of running shorts from Walmart, and I don't run any slower when I wear them than when I wear my Nike shorts. In fact, I can't tell the difference. My favorite pair of running shorts are BCG brand, not Nike. Avia could provide athletic team apparel to the Ducks that feels pretty similar to what Nike provides. The Ducks could take the field in apparel provided by Walmart and they wouldn't run any slower, throw the ball any less accurately, shoot with any lower percentage or hit with any lower of an average. 

So if Walmart were to come to the table and commit to providing everything Nike provides and a financial incentive far greater than Nike, would any major university be willing to announce that they've dropped Nike or Adidas or Under Armour in favor of a Walmart brand?

Not a chance. But why?

The answer, of course: Perception. Pride. Respect. Quality.

There's no coach or athletic director in the country that is going to send their team on the field wearing Avia or BCG or C9. And even if they were, how tough would it be to recruit kids to come play for a school if they know they'll be trading in the swoosh for the... uh, "I" with a little arrow thingy on top? The coaches, the department personnel and the kids would be embarrassed to compete in anything but a top name brand. And why? Because they'd look ridiculous. It's the same reason NBA players don't shoot free throws granny-style, despite the scientific data that shows they'd make way more shots that way. They'd get laughed at. And no one wants to be laughed at.

I'm not arguing that this is a bad thing. I jog in cheap jogging shorts. But rest assured that if I were going to be on national television, I'd go buy some brand new Nike shorts. I'd also probably try to drop a few pounds. Because on the national stage, we all want to look good. And no disrespect to Walmart, but running out of the tunnel wearing the Avia logo on your chest is not an idea that gets anyone excited. It all makes complete and total sense. I get it.

But there's something I don't get. 

There's something I don't understand at all.

This philosophy of looking good and only being willing to wear what looks the best or shoot the way that looks the best... the philosophy that we all think makes complete and total sense... why does that not apply to everything that represents our collegiate sports teams?

Why are we willing to let our team run out of the tunnel after an intro/hype video that doesn't actually build any hype? Why do we show videoboard prompts that are cheap, canned reproductions that don't match our brand? Why do we promote the sport that has the highest potential and greatest need for ticket sales revenue with marketing collateral that is just "good enough," has no research behind it and isn't positioned to actually drive attendance? Why do we not even consider for one second letting our teams wear something that isn't absolutely first-class, but when it comes to promoting those sports, driving attendance and building a game experience, we often settle for what is least expensive? This isn't the case everywhere, of course, but there are so many times at so many major universities that an athletic department will choose the Walmart version of a creative service over the Nike equivalent.

A glaring example of this is most universities' online ticket buying portals. Every school in the country wants to sell more tickets. Every school in the country wants to drive attendance. Yet if you look at the online ticket purchasing experience at those schools, the user interface is terrible, it's impossible to find the information you need, it takes way too many clicks to purchase and the pages are bland and boring and do nothing to actually make a fan want to come to the event. Everything about these portals depend on a fan already wanting to come to the event so badly that they're willing to jump through hoops to buy a ticket. And not even cool, exciting, flaming-hoops-of-fire. Boring, bland, unexciting hoops. 

Promoting our teams with poor quality marketing isn't just as bad as sending them onto the court in Walmart brand shoes. It's like sending them onto the court with no shoes at all. We wouldn't be giving them the tools to succeed and by relying on the least expensive option for marketing, we're not giving ourselves the tools to succeed in driving attendance. 

So all that said, I'm not ignorant to the idea that sometimes the least expensive option is the only option. Budgets are tight in collegiate athletics and sometimes you can control the amount you're given to promote your sports. So here are some practical tips that you can employ to help drive attendance at your events.

Ticket Sales Portal

Count the Clicks - How many clicks does it take to buy a ticket on your website? On the high end, we sometimes see that it can take up to 7-8 clicks to make a purchase. Some have streamlined it down to as few as 3. Obviously, the lower the number, the more likely people are to purchase. And most of the time, you can make changes to your site to bring that number down. Count the number of clicks it takes to make a purchase and see if you can cut that number in half.

Spruce Up the Joint - Unfortunately, most ticketing companies provide a portal that is boring and unengaging. They don't do much to actually make a fan want to purchase. But there are typically at least a couple of things you can to do customize that page. Take advantage of those opportunities by bringing your marketing campaign for that sport into the headers and other graphics on that page. In a perfect world, add some video content to those pages, even if it's just your stadium intro/hype video. Fans love to watch those things and if the only place to watch it is by going to your ticket sales page, that could go a long way toward driving ticket sales. Best way to sell a ticket to someone is to give them the opportunity to buy when they're most excited about it. 

Marketing Collateral

Forget Your Die-Hard Fans - I wrote an article a few weeks ago about how we need to start looking at schedule posters as advertisements rather than promotional tools. Because most of the time, they don't do much to drive attendance. But every advertising campaign starts with research to determine who your audience is. Maybe you don't have a budget for research. That's fine. You know your area and you know who has the most potential to become new ticket purchasers. Spend some time thinking about who those people are and develop a campaign that targets those people. The die-hard fans are going to come regardless of what the poster looks like or the tagline that's on it. So think about a way to appeal (both through messaging and through the visuals) to a different group. You'll probably find that putting all the seniors on the poster with a generic tagline isn't the best way to appeal to those people. Be bold and put something unique out there. Because like I said, the die-hards are coming anyway. And by trying something unique you just might appeal to a totally new group.

Game Experience

Take Advantage of Your Friends & Family - The best thing I can advise for improving your game experience is to identify where things are lacking. And the best way to do that is to engage a firm to do a comprehensive gameday audit. But if your budget doesn't allow for that, make your friends and family work for those tickets they begged you for! Give them a checklist and have them rate every experience on a scale of 1 to 5. Ticket takers, concessionaires, ushers, intro video, band, cheer, etc. You may not get a comprehensive report from industry experts, but you'll have more information than you started with. And sometimes it's good to have input from people who aren't immersed in collegiate athletics 24/7. At the very least, you'll have a unique perspective outside your own.

 

With college football’s “Best Kickoff Weekend Ever” just finished, there’s no better time to look back at many of our fall sports posters for this season. Several of these football designs were rightfully noted in best-of preseason poster rankings and those ranks are listed below. Since volleyball, soccer and other sports have also fired up their seasons recently, we’ll show off their designs as well.

SMU

Poster Swag #33 and Bleacher Report #11

If you follow the Old Hat blog, you may have seen several stories about the SMU 'Get Here For Gameday' campaign. Following the Sports 180 process and significant research, this poster was created by Jared Stanley. "The whole point of the poster was to make gameday something not to be missed in the city of Dallas," Jared said. "The inspiration was superhero movie posters." Mission accomplished! This was the only poster that was mentioned on both preseason poster rankings. Other fall sports posters were created from this template and are shown below.

 

Pittsburgh

Poster Swag #12 

Old Hat designer Geoff Rogers has designed nearly 900 posters in his nine years here. (So doing great design is 'old hat' to Geoff? Sorry...) This was his favorite from this year, which was a tough choice over several other great options. Pitt wanted to spotlight their new uniforms, their facilty and players. The key Geoff says is "taking the client suggestions and then using his expertise to make it look good. And it's so much more than making it look good, it's being a problem solver. Using what you have and the time you have to do to it to achieve what the client wants." This poster also became a template for other fall sports, each using the same look and layout of Geoff's football masterpiece.

 

Florida State

Bleacher Report #17

These are my favorite for multiple reasons. I've been a fan of Seminole football since the early 90s and I was fortunate to be able to design this year's poster(s). Just as Geoff said above, we take the ideas from the client and meld them into something special. There are several things going on in these posters that might not be visible at first glance. The state outline in the background is a reference to FSU victories last year over Miami, Florida and South Florida. Several background images of note (behind the state and the players) include the new HD videoboard, Chief Osceola and Renegade and two of my favorite all-time Noles (Derrick Brooks and Charlie Ward). Raymond James Stadium is the site of the National Championship this year and if you look closely, it's the reflection in Jimbo Fisher's sunglasses. Finally with three posters, we were able to highlight 30 members of the team. If recent drafts are any indication, most of those guys will be in the NFL in a few years.

 

Utah

Poster Swag #49 

Douglas Wilson is Old Hat's designer for the University of Utah. He's located in Salt Lake City, working on campus with the Utes. While he doesn't work with the variety of schools and color combos that the other designers do, he certainly has the look for Utah nailed down as you see with his posters here. He says that while sometimes it can be difficult working with those who have ideas different than your own, it's satisfying to create something that balances both sets of ideas to make the best design possible. The client is usually good with what you create as long as the essence of their ideas remains intact.

Western Michigan

Poster Swag #40


Florida International

Poster Swag #24


Syracuse

Bleacher Report #21


 

 

 

 

 


There are a million different (well, lots of) ways to do your schedule poster. Some schools prefer a uniform look with the same design for multiple sports. Others want a different, unique identity for each sport. To show our skills and demonstrate this point, here are several examples of Old Hat designs using fall sports other than football.

 

The article I posted earlier in the week has caused some negative, yet understandable feedback. It comes as no surprise to me that some feathers were ruffled by the solution I proposed to the new Federal Labor Standards Act. Below is an expanded version of a response I posted to a comment on the original blog post.

I would like to reiterate what I stated in the article which is that, "If you love your current creative staff or freelancer, don’t fire them just because you can’t afford to pay them enough to meet all your needs." The idea that we are advocating widespread layoffs leaves me wondering if people actually read the article or just the headline. I clearly stated that I do not feel changes should be made if an athletic department has a good creative staff in place. 

What some people may not realize is that I was once on an internal creative staff myself. And if I felt that someone were advocating that I get fired, I'd be quite upset. However, the FLSA rules are estimated to have a $1.5 million impact to the average mid-major athletic department. While some can absorb that, others will have to make cuts. That's just the reality of the situation. I would love to think that rather than cutting anyone, departments would increase everyone's wage to the new threshold. I just don't believe that's realistic. Departments will have a greater need than ever to get fans in seats to increase revenue and honestly, I've never seen a situation in which using Old Hat wouldn't save an athletic department vast sums of money over having in-house creative. I've run the numbers many times and the fact of the matter is, a department could save themselves thousands of dollars annually by using Old Hat for their high level creative rather than an in-house crew. 

We can't forget that the mission of an athletic department is anything other than educating the student-athlete and giving the opportunity to as many young people as possible to compete and get an education. The FLSA rules are going to have a major impact whether we like it or not. We are simply recommending an option that will help contribute to a department's ability to continue that mission.

Big changes to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) will take effect on December 1, 2016. That means you have the first half of the school year to: (a) get as much overtime out of your current employees as possible while you still can, and (b) figure out how the heck you’re going to make things work when the new rules go into effect. 

Here’s the issue in a nutshell: you won’t be able to afford to keep doing things the way you do them today. 

We all know that there’s no such thing as a 40 hour workweek for employees in collegiate athletics. Especially not for employees at the lower end of the pay scale. Right now, you don’t have to pay overtime rates to professional, administrative or executive employees whose salaries are $23,660 per year or more. But come December, that threshold jumps to $47,476 per year. So here’s the question: can you survive without all the overtime hours your lower-paid employees currently work, or can you afford to pay them a lot more in the future? 

It’s not like you have a bunch of extra money laying around. And if you’re a Division I school, you may already in a budget crunch thanks to recent changes related to food service and scholarship rules.

Unfortunately, your practices, games, and related activities are not going to magically start fitting into a tidy little 40 hour workweek…no matter how many of you write letters to Santa. 

Something’s gotta give.

Here’s our advice: cut your creative staff.

Yep. You heard that right. 

Drastic times call for drastic measures. 

So yeah. Your graphic designer. Your video production specialist. Send’em packing.

We’re not saying you don’t need marketing support. Of course you do! It’s just that you don’t need to keep those individuals on your staff as yet another piece of your salary and overtime puzzle. And even if your marketing team isn’t working overtime, we all know they’re still a likely target when budget cuts come around.

The way we see it, you’ve got 3 alternatives to consider.

#1 – Hire Freelancers

If you’ve never tried it before, this might sound like a good idea. But most of you who have been around the block once or twice are cringing right now. Most athletic departments haven’t had a lot of luck with freelancers providing consistently high-quality work that’s on time and on target. Unless you have a freelancer who has worked with you before or who came from the collegiate athletics marketing industry, you’ll probably find they lack the expertise and insight you’re looking for. On the other hand, if you’re lucky enough to have found a really great freelancer, that person is probably working a lot more than 40 hours for you at an annual salary that’s lower than the new FLSA threshold…which means in December, you’ll have the same problem with your freelance rock star as you would with your own in-house staff.

#2 – Two Words: Student Internship

Hey, look around. In your neighborhood, there’s no shortage of young soon-to-be-professionals eager to build their resumes and score some real-world experience. And most of them don’t want to work anywhere close to 40 hours a week anyway. Assembling a low-cost creative staff will be like shooting fish in a barrel! What could possibly go wrong? Well, other than lack of experience, inconsistency, the need for a lot of oversight, not having any of the aforementioned industry expertise, some pesky rules or limitations… Reality check: you get what you pay for. There’s a reason you haven’t relied on this type of manpower to serve as your creative staff before. Sure, you may have some top-notch students who help you out from time to time, and that’s great. But as a year-over-year strategy, trying to rely on them to fill the gap FLSA is about to create won’t earn you a barrel of Gatorade over the head.

#3 – Outsource It

If only you knew somebody with a wealth of industry experience, mad design skills, a deep bench of talent, and serious strategic chops that you could hire and rely on without having to even think about overtime or paying a higher salary. Oh, wait. You do. All joking aside, Old Hat can provide everything you need from a creative standpoint. From design to video production, project management, strategic planning and copywriting, we offer a full range of creative services. We’re good enough, we’re smart enough, and doggone it, people like us. If you don’t have your dream team in place right now, take them off your payroll and let us be your creative staff instead. Want to have a designer right there on campus with you? No problem – we can be the one to hire them, pay them, and worry about their hours, plus we’ve got the capacity to absorb any excess work. 

Or don’t cut your creative staff. Augment them the smart way.

If you love your current creative staff or freelancer, don’t fire them just because you can’t afford to pay them enough to meet all your needs. I mean, really. Do we come across as that callous or short-sighted? (For the record, we’re neither.) Instead, let us augment your team and handle all those extra hours you can’t afford to pay them for. Old Hat can provide you subscription-style creative support that will cost you a lot less in the long run than paying overtime rates or higher salaries, while delivering the highest quality results. We’ll work with you to come up with a plan that gives you all services you need, when you need them. We’ll even dedicate somebody to becoming your brand expert. Everybody wins! Want to talk it over? Give us a call.

 

Your brand is the story. Your logo is the cover of the book. That's how I would best describe the brand/logo relationship.

And unfortunately as often as we're told not to judge a book by its cover, that's exactly what we do because that's all we can do. What else do we have to judge it on, and who wants to read the book if the cover isn't enticing in some way?

We recently worked with the Amateur Softball Association/USA Softball on their logo rebrand. It was more than just a visual rebrand, they also decided to consolidate their name into USA Softball. They are the National Governing Body of Softball after all, so it made sense to make the name change on the heels of an Olympic year and with the buzz of softball being reinstated into the 2020 Olympic games (which was just finalized yesterday!).

Let's take a look at the new USA Softball and I'll also share some key points during the rebranding process.

Pre-Planning

Before it goes beyond your walls, there are things that need to be discussed internally by those closest to your brand. If you're scrapping your current logo and starting over, a lot of questions need to be answered to ensure you stay on track and in line with your company's core values. There's no doubt your brand has gained equity over time (probably more than you realize), so you need to be willing to give some of this up to start fresh. Here are some questions and thoughts to consider:

• Rebrand or refresh?

Sometimes a total overhaul isn't needed, but you should assess whether making changes to your current logo will suffice or if it's time to start new. Consider how much brand equity you have, what your current mark represents to your customers and raving fans, and whether slight modifications to your existing logo can get you through the next 10 years.

• Why are we doing it?

If you can't figure out why you're wanting to refresh or rebrand, it's probably not the right time. Your reasoning could be based on some event that has you moving a slightly different direction, or you're wanting to use a rebrand as a jumpstart to offer something different or enter a new market. Or perhaps your current logo/brand is stale and you want to rejuvenate your fanbase and customers by creating something new and exciting. Whatever the reason, make sure you know why you're doing it, because you will have to explain it at some point.

• Get buy-in early

Everyone doesn't have to be on board for a rebrand, but your key stakeholders and decision makers should be. Not only do you need buy-in from them early, you also need to know how involved they want to be and get any input on the direction in the beginning stages. Nothing will frustrate you more than developing a new brand that doesn't make it past the head guy's office.

The Rebrand

Deciding to do a rebrand is tough, but actually getting to a logo that everyone can live with is the real challenge. Here are some points to consider during the logo creation stage:

• Tell your story

As I mentioned, your brand is the story. And although your logo won't tell the full story of your brand, you should be able to easily explain how your logo is a good representation of your brand and your overall company culture. Remember, this is all people will judge you by until they get to know the full story.

• Get input early

It's important to get any preconceived ideas out on the table before starting on those first sketches. Get examples from others about what they like and why they like it. Just keep in mind any ideas should be easily tied to your brand.

• KISS

Keep it simple, stupid. This is easier said than done, but the best logos are the simple ones. Don't add things to the mix to accommodate everyone. Strip away what you can without removing the essence of your brand.

• Don't stray too far

After you've nailed down the primary logo, you'll likely want to create variations of this logo for other applications. Try not to stray too far with secondary and tertiary logo marks, and know when and how to effectively use them. You don't want to cause confusion about your brand by releasing 18 versions of your new logo.

 

 

The Unveil

• Celebrate it!

Soft rollouts are for wimps. You just created a new logo, now show the world! You've got to take that logo by the horns and ride it where it takes you.

• Timing is everything

Choose your timing. Consider what's going on in your industry and what events you have coming up within your own company that will naturally get more exposure. And if there's nothing noteworthy going on around you, use your logo unveil to stir up some excitement.

• You won't please everyone

There will inevitably be people that don't like your logo. Know that going into a rebrand. You'll hear more about the negatives than the positives, which is why it's important that you've considered all the things mentioned previously. This is your creation and careful consideration was given at every step, so don't take every uneducated and flippant comment to heart. If you can justify why you're doing what you're doing, you'll eventually get buy-in from those that matter.

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