When somebody visits your website, you have to grab their attention right away if you want them to stick around and consume the content you are offering.

In the past, we have always told our clients they have between 30 and 60 seconds to get a site visitor’s attention. If you don’t give somebody a reason to stay before that first minute is up, they’re gone (and they probably aren’t coming back).

That’s a short period of time in which to win somebody over. But guess what? It’s about to get even shorter.

Recent reports indicate that Millennials only have an eight-second attention span. Eight seconds? Really? How does one go through life with only an eight-second attention span?

I am usually classified as a Millennial. I may be at the very top of the age range, but I am a Millennial by most accounts. It has taken me more than eight seconds to write this much, so I am confident in saying my attention span is at least double that of the average Millennial! YES!!!

Jokes and time keeping aside, how do you capture somebody’s attention in such a brief amount of time? For that matter, how do you keep their attention through an entire game?

The NBA is thinking about cutting back the number of timeouts to shorten game length and keep the attention of those eight-second Millennials. If even the NBA struggles keep somebody’s attention, how can you possibly succeed? It is a challenge, but one that can be accomplished.

 

First, you have to know your audience. The NBA meticulously studies their fans and their games. That helped them identify the issue of attention-loss and provided insights on how to make adjustments that will keep people more engaged.

Data is key, and when it comes to your website, analytics are a great place to start. What content is garnering the most attention on your website? What pages do visitors tend spend the most time on? Studying this information will help you make strategic decisions.

The same goes for game day. You may have won the fight against the couch and the HD TV to get people to the game, but once they’re there you have to make sure you engage them enough that they want to come back. Each fan base is unique, so it’s important to study your fans and understand their habits and preferences. Research will help you take the guesswork out of your decisions.

 

Second, you have to be open to change. After looking at what’s working for them and what’s not, the NBA might change their rules to shorten games. I am sure basketball purists will cringe at the thought of changing the game, but like other businesses, the NBA has a brand to protect and a bottom line that they want in the black. There are plenty of examples of leagues or businesses that alienate people by trying to change things, and that’s why doing your homework is so important. When you have data to analyze, your decisions will be more informed and the change you make will be more likely to be successful.

Think about your website. Is there a different type of article you have been considering, but never published? Is there more information you can provide so you are positioned as a trusted resource for your visitors? What content do you have access to that no one else does? Those are the items that get people to come back. Your goal should be to be a part of your fans’ daily habit. What content will do that for you?

Making large-scale changes to game day comes with greater risk than making changes to your website, so it’s even more crucial to have a solid understanding of what’s going to resonate best with your fans.

Finally, you have to plan. The NBA isn’t just changing things on the fly. They have collected data, they’ve explored possible changes, and they have a long-term plan that will help them reach their goals. You should, too.

If attention spans are down to eight seconds now, where will they be in five or ten years? The data you gather today not only allows you to make informed decisions for the near-term, it should also help you recognize trends that you can incorporate into your long-term plans. If you spend a month working to engage visitors and become a part of their habit, but run out of content, you will drop out of their daily habits in less than eight seconds. Think about your goals for the year. Think about what has been successful in the past. Analyze your data and come up with a plan for how you can deliver engaging content throughout the season, the year, and the life of your website. Then continue to gather data so you can refine and improve your plan over time.

 

January has already come and gone! Can you believe it? As we finish up materials for spring sports it means that football season is RIGHT AROUND THE CORNER! The past couple of weeks conferences have released their schedules and I can already feel the excitement for the 2017 season. If you start planning ahead there might be some special things you can do to create even cooler materials for your fans! 

Specialty printing

Haven’t set the budget for 2017 season yet? Put some extra money in your budget for your football poster and we can do some special printing techniques. You can do a cool die cut, make your poster shine, or even give it a funky texture. Not sure if your printer can handle any of that—contact one of our client reps and we can get you a quote from a TRUSTED printer! 

Social Media

Now that Instagram has stories and Snapchat is one of the leading apps for the kids, you can promote your games, schedules, athletes and fans in a multitude of creative ways. Start thinking about different utilizations of those features to get information in front of your fans

Tickets

Tickets are often the first project we do for football season, but maybe it's early and you don’t have a concept or direction you want to go? Don’t worry! We can help! Think about using past athletes on tickets if you don’t know who is going to be a star yet. Or just let us feature your brand and opponents and we’ll come up with something stellar. Tickets are another great piece you can use specialty printing on. 

Marketing Materials

If you have a spring game coming up and the temperature is hot in your city think of a different type of item to use to promote the upcoming season. Maybe a fan? Anything YOU can think of WE can design. 

Billboards

Billboards can be used very creatively. They can have extensions or holes in them to create a larger-than-life message. Think about a crazy way to get drivers' attentions and promote your brand!

Start planning and budgeting for football now and let us help you create some incredible materials for 2017! Email us if you need anything! 

There are a handful of people who make your job never feel like a job. They challenge you to do your best work and they trust you to accomplish that feat. It is truly a pleasure working with them. I can say without a doubt that Brad Wurthman, Associate Director of Athletics, Marketing/Fan Development at the University of Illinois, is one of those people. He started working with Old Hat in 2011 while at the University of Cincinnati. Brad's very first project was this Bearcats Football Black Out game poster.

Everybody loved The Dark Knight theme in 2011!

His first video with us happened in 2012 and we've been fortunate to work with "America's Favorite Canadian Ginger" ever since. Some of my absolute favorite projects have been Wurthman's.

So what's the real story with this guy? We asked him 20 Questions to find out. Feel free to add your own Canadian accent when reading this.

1. NAME: Brad Wurthman

2. OCCUPATION/TITLE: Associate Director of Athletics, Marketing/Fan Development

3. HOMETOWN: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

4. PREGAME RITUAL: Gum. Lots of gum. Specifically bubble gum. Plus trash talking. Other than that, I normally try to find about a 2 minute window where I’m completely on my own to just take a look at all of the work that has gone into preparing for our game and the people who worked on it to enjoy that feeling of accomplishment.

5. FAVORITE THING TO SNACK ON: Cookies. Is that a snack? If not, it would still win. I’d still pick cookies even if I wasn’t allowed to.

6. FAVORITE THING ABOUT YOUR JOB: Having the opportunity to be part of a team that can make an immediate impact on something that people are emotionally invested in. There’s a reason I want to sell sports and not something else.

7. LEAST FAVORITE THING ABOUT YOUR JOB: Since everyone can be involved in everything at times, progress can be slowed for certain projects – just have to keep your wits about you and commit to finding the best solution possible.

8. HIDDEN TALENTS/HOBBIES: Drawing/Illustration, Snowboarding, Baking

9. ADVICE TO YOUR YOUNGER SELF: Breathe. Take a moment to do the things that are important to you for personal reasons and not just for professional reasons. Set boundaries and stick to them – without compromising your ambition. Focus on learning, not only on progressing. Most importantly, always leave the blackjack table when you have more money than you arrived with.

10. YOUR GO-TO KARAOKE SONG: I think everyone has to have a three song rotation, unless you’re talented enough to audition for The Voice. Karaoke is not about my voice – it’s about crowd interaction. So, in very specific order…Don’t Stop Believing by Journey, Friends in Low Places by Garth Brooks, Hero by Enrique Iglesias.

11. FAVORITE MOVIE: Jurassic Park

12. FAVORITE TV SHOW: House of Cards

13. IF YOU WERE IN A BOY BAND WHAT WOULD IT BE CALLED: Who says I wasn’t? The Eh Team.

14. FAVORITE PLACE TO EAT: Smoke’s Poutinerie

15. WHAT DO YOU ORDER THERE: Montreal style smoked meat poutine

16. FAVORITE DISNEY PRINCESS: No contest. Ariel. Gingers have to stick together.

17. WHAT’S YOUR SPIRIT ANIMAL: I took two quizzes to answer this question. One said lion, one said llama. So, take that for what it’s worth.

18. WHAT’S THE STUPIDEST THING YOU’VE EVER DONE: All in a matter of about 2 weeks, I committed to go on a 3 week trip to China after graduating college. Though it turned out to be one of the best experiences of my life, I had no actual idea what I was signing up for at the time and it didn’t actually hit me until I was staring down at the center of the Pacific Ocean. Sometimes, not thinking about the end result leads to you to make the best decisions!

19. WHAT’S THE LAST SHOW THAT YOU BINGE-WATCHED: Narcos.

20. IF YOU WEREN’T DOING THIS JOB WHAT WOULD YOU BE DOING: I grew up in a family of teachers and really believe in the power of education – but was not blessed with the same patience gene for rooms of 30 children so that was never going to work. However, I’d love to teach snowboarding and live in Western Canada at one of the resorts – it’s so much fun to watch someone experience their first linked turn because it’s a very individual sport – either you commit to it and fight through it or you don’t. I’m a sucker for a good story about overcoming challenges.

I've never been to London on the underground transit system, commonly referred to as the Tube, but I've heard the phrase mind the gap. And apparently so has every Londoner, as that phrase repeats at every underground stop. The purpose of the recording (and signs plastered along the platform and train) is to remind commuters as they're getting on and off the Tube to be aware of the gap that exists between the platform and the train, so they can safely enter/exit.

That would be a great sign to have in my own home and office, and maybe even have my own recording wake me up each day telling me to mind the gap. Why? Because a gap exists.

In every aspect of your life and my life, a gap exists. It's an abyss that separates perception from reality, intentions from actions, what is said from what is heard, and so on. It exists in both our personal lives and our professional lives. Personally, it might be the difference in where you are and where you want to be. In the workplace, it can be the reason strategies don't get executed or plans don't get implemented. It's likely the cause for senior level expectations not being met by frontline employees.

If it didn't come across already, let me be clear: the gap is bad. And the bigger the gap, the worse off people/plans on both sides of the gap will be. 

Unlike London commuters, no one can avoid this gap to some degree (not even when you're aware of it), but there are certainly steps that can be taken to bridge or even shrink the gap, preferably the latter. Bridging the gap is a quick fix for problems that have slowly eroded both sides, increasing the expanse of the gap. Shrinking the gap is the long-term solution, but requires effort with every decision and every action.

After all that, you might still be asking, "What is this gap you're talking about?" The gap I'm referring to is that theoretical area that contains all information in its purest form. That information might be in the form of communication, intentions, actions, commands, data or even emotions.

Read here if you want it explained with mathematical logic: If you think about it in a geometrical sense, it's the difference between Point A and Point B. A straight line exists between the two, but even the shortest line contains some information, otherwise it would be one point. Think of that line as the loss of information from Point A to Point B. The longer the line (the bigger the gap), the more information lost.

Read here if you want it explained in a cute story, based on actual events: Two guys were hiking through the Andes Mountains and happened to get separated. We'll call them Zac and Robert to keep it simple. After days of wandering and searching, they finally found each other, but were on opposite sides of a deep, wide canyon. Fortunately, Zac had a very long rope in his backpack, whereas Robert chose to find his resources in nature. In this case, it made sense for Robert to yell out to Zac "Throw me a rope!" across the great divide. However, Zac misunderstood what Robert had said (it was also very windy that day) and thought Robert had said "Throw me a bone!", which didn't seem to make a lot of sense considering the circumstances, but Zac complied and threw the jawbone of a nearby dead mountain goat to Robert, then went on his way. Not being as resourceful as he had earlier thought, Robert later died of starvation in the Andes Mountains, just a few hundred yards from a Burger King. The gap in this story is the literal gap that existed between Zac and Robert, which caused the miscommunication, and the eventual death of Robert.

Discover the Gaps

As I mentioned, there are many different kinds of gaps. The first step is uncovering where those gaps exist. That's something that we've been working on with our own clients, as part of our Sports180 process. It's hard to tailor a campaign, strategy or even a message if it's unclear what is expected by those receiving your message. Do they feel the same way about your brand, athletics programs, or mission as you do? And they does not necessarily mean fans. It starts internally. How does your own athletics organization see itself? Is everyone on the same page from the top down, and across all departments? With the revolving door of employees that often make up an athletics department, it's important to be clear about long-term goals and how that relates to everyday activity by all employees. Is everyone pulling the rope the same direction?

Get to the Root

If you've determined what those gaps are internally or externally, it's not enough just to acknowledge it, build a quick-fix bridge, and move on. Get to the heart of the matter. You've probably heard it said that if you ask "Why?" five times, you're likely to get to the real problem. Don't stop short, you've got to keep digging to figure out why the gaps exist in all areas before you can address them.

It Starts with Communication

D1.Ticker/Athletic Director U. had a great article that discussed the gap between leadership and employees, and why strategies often start off strong but fail to get executed properly, or not at all. In most cases, it starts with communication. In the world of athletics, communication silos are often a problem, as departments don't have daily interaction with each other to make sure all parties are heading toward the same goal.

It's Every Day

It's not enough to sit down with your entire staff once or twice a year and talk about your annual goals. Sure, it's important to do this, but if you're not making it a point to reach those goals each and every day with every employee, you'll never have success in hitting them. It's a challenge to keep everyone heading the same direction every day, but by doing a few things you can make the long-term goals more manageable.

• Give everyone a voice and hold them accountable: There are times when a top-down approach will be needed in communicating overall department goals. But there should be more instances where middle management and frontline employees are involved in formulating those goals. Employees want to be a part of the process, especially if their daily activities are centered around these long-term goals. It's also much easier to hold employees accountable when their voices have helped to shape goals, strategies and objectives.

• Form teams and assign tasks: Too many cooks spoil the broth. Limit the amount of big meetings you have, they're generally a waste of your resources. Once you have your long-term goals and assignments for which departments will handle certain aspects of those goals, break it down into smaller objectives, smaller groups, and shorter meetings. Make sure everyone in a meeting is involved in some way, and has a task assigned. Otherwise, you're just wasting their time.

• Hold team members accountable: Or even better, make the smaller teams hold each other accountable. Short check-up meetings are helpful, but don't overdo it. Employees don't need a babysitter watching over them, and they'll feel more responsible for the results if they've done it on their own.

Find the gap, mind the gap.

 

Let's be honest, in athletics, there's a ton of information that needs to be communicated to your fans and a multitude of platforms to do it. We're talking hundreds of games, events, and student athletes each year. And you need to cover your social media bases with Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, Gryzzl, etc, etc. That's an overwhelming and time-consuming amount of work. In addition to that, most schools don't have the luxury of having one person responsible for all of their many accounts. So, in order to make sure you have a cohesive brand look across multiple accounts, it's best to have some assistance. If only there was some sort of tool to help you out?

We partnered with several schools to create social media template packages tailored to each of their needs. This gives each school a cohesive library of templates created specifically for them. A few examples include:

  • Gameday Graphics
  • Final Score Graphics
  • Player of the Game/Week
  • Player / Coach / Team Awards
  • Starting Lineups
  • Player Stats
  • Holidays

These templates enable each school's marketing and sports information departments to update text, photos, logos, and other elements within each template so that they can post information quickly across many sports. They can also be sized to work across multiple platforms so that the messaging looks the same on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, the official athletic website and more. Additionally, all of the templates are created to complement each other, so the information being posted across the athletic department looks clean, polished, consistent, and most of all -  ON BRAND

Check out how some of our partners at Duke, Pitt, Marist and FIU are all using the custom templates that we created for each of them....

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Give us a call to learn more about how we can help bring your brand together online and create tailored graphic templates for you!

 

 

 

 

Does Major League Soccer have the secret recipe for driving attendance?  For the third consecutive season fans have attended matches in record numbers. When a league is young, this type of headline is an every season occurrence, however MLS has been around since 1996 (1993 if you want to get really technical). They are still growing their supporter base after 20 years. MLS has added quite a few teams since its inception, and even a few more in the last five years, but teams that have been around since the early years are still growing those attendance numbers. 

Unfortunately, there is no magic bullet for increasing attendance. Yes, all fans share some similarities, but when trying to increase the number of people attending a sport that usually does not rank in the top three (and sometimes four) of favorite sports in the United States, you are going to have to work for it. 

Let’s take a look at some of the things MLS has done to help increase those numbers.

Investment -This is an obvious requirement for sports organizations. MLS had to invest in a few different areas. Most importantly, they are starting to build more and more soccer-specific stadiums. Personally, this is one of the reasons I was not attracted to MLS when it first started getting games on TV. Trying to watch a soccer game with the yard lines from football in the background made for a terrible experience.

Farm System - MLS has worked with United Soccer League (USL) to setup lower leagues and build their support as well. This may not seem like it has a direct correlation with the increase in attendance in the MLS, but it helps. There are USL teams in places like Austin and Laredo, Texas where it is unlikely an MLS team will actually set up, but having these teams in the area helps the sport grow and helping the sport grow helps increase attendance.

Designated Players - Another aspect that should be mentioned and is often discussed when considering the growth in the fan base of the MLS is the designated players. The league has a salary cap, but teams are allowed to have “designated players” where only a portion of their salary goes against the cap. Probably the most famous example of this policy is David Beckham. He definitely brought attention to the league as he played out the twilight years of his career in Los Angeles. Now, most teams have at least one designated player. More often than not, they are similar to Beckham in the fact that they had a successful career at the top of the game in European leagues and then moved to the MLS once they were past their prime. Hard core soccer fans bemoan the fact that the league only gets the old guys who can not play at the top levels any more, but to the everyday fan getting to see players like Beckham, Frank Lampard, David Villa or Didier Drogba is a huge draw and gets people to buy tickets. In a perfect world, you would want those players when they are in their prime, but at this point in the league, butts in seats trumps just about everything.

Embrace Your Fanbase - Fans of this league are different from most and the MLS has learned to capitalize on that uniqueness. They do not try to fit their fans into the model that works for the NFL. They have embraced the differences. Most stadiums have sections for the hard core fans that are going to chant, scream, and yell during the matches. Teams have also realized that a lot of their following will come from the younger generation that is playing soccer on Saturday mornings. Most teams have youth areas before games and involve their players in local leagues or more grassroots marketing efforts to reach those kids. Some teams have gone even further to work with their city to make sure transportation in and out of the stadium is a pleasant experience for fans.

Major League Soccer provides an interesting case study due to its relative youth. They worked hard early to utilize what was available to maximize their impact. As they have grown, they made the improvements necessary to keep their fans engaged. Now the league is entering its third decade and experiencing quite the renaissance. I think the founders of the league would be quite happy to see what the league has become and where it is headed.

Play hard. Play smart. Play together.

Okay, so I borrowed that from the Runnin' Utes...but how can you argue with that philosophy? While it is meant for the basketball team, it most certainly can be applied to our projection video creative process.

Play hard.

A project of this scale is not something you can just throw together last minute. For an October release date, we started the planning and concepting last June. We had weekly phone calls with Grant at Utah to discuss our plans and how we could best execute what he was looking to accomplish. We talked about how many versions would be needed, what kind of effects to use, key moments and players to feature, coach's philosophy, music, and even crowd participation. Grant spent time with his team to provide a story board outlining the videos and providing content. We then took those initial story boards and brought them to life in production. New 3D effects and concepts were created to show the court falling away into darkness, the Block U logo matching the beat of the music, and the court rippling and waving to name a few.

Play smart.

Sure, the 3D effects are awesomely cool, but it means more when there is a story to tell. We took the time to artfully script the video to flow as nicely as possible. Other things to consider include crowd participation and timing with the pre-game festivities. We also follow our well-tested process of providing smaller segments at a time for approval so we can be as efficient as possible. 

Play together.

There's no way this could have been done without the help of Grant and his team at Utah. They understand what they need to provide regarding direction and input and trust us to do the rest. Our editing team has so much fun with these 3D projection videos. While we have gained valuable experience and learned a lot over the past three years of projection videos, the sky's the limit as to what we can do next!  

Here's a look at this year's Runnin' Utes intro video:

Using some of the same 3D elements but different player features, here's the women's basketball intro:

At the 2016 NACMA Conference, Old Hat lead a presentation on marketing automation. We highlighted the success of RaiseUpCarolina.com, a ticket sales website built for UNC that has helped increase ticket sales revenue by more than $500,000 and aided in selling out their premium seating areas for the first time ever. Marketing automation is one of the tools we used as a part of that project. We took a uniquely positioned website with a great user experience that built excitement for a specific program and turned it into a ridiculously effective sales tool.

A lot of people think of marketing automation as a ticket sales tool, in and of itself. I disagree. I don't think of marketing automation as a tool any more than I think of the handle of a hammer as a tool. The handle of a hammer is only effective if it has the head and/or claw of the hammer. Without one or both of those, it's completely ineffective in achieving its goal. Marketing automation is no different. Without combining marketing automation with other elements to drive results, you're stuck with something as ineffective as the handle of a hammer would be in driving nails.

Some ticketing companies are starting to offer marketing automation as a part of their platform. First, fans visit a school's primary athletic website, navigate to the ticket portal and then their activity is logged and put into the automation system. That information is segmented into audiences and communicated based on their interest on the site. However, there's one major problem with this approach: It's predicated on the idea that people are already interested in coming to those events. If they already want to come, attendance wouldn't be an issue in the first place. 

Think about it this way: using marketing automation on a ticket portal through a primary athletic website (goheels.com, for instance) is like putting a ticket sales phone number on a blank, white piece of paper and posting it on a telephone pole on a street corner. It's boring, uninviting, really hard to find and once you do find it, it does nothing to actually make you want to attend the event.

Marketing automation is an amazing way to help increase ticket sales and attendance, but tracking fans' activity on a ticket portal that no one is coming to doesn't take advantage of the power of marketing automation. If no one is coming to your ticket purchasing pages, you're not going to have anyone to track. 

Marketing automation is simply a piece of a ticket sales tool. And here are the three things that render it completely ineffective.

1. Dedicated Ticket Sales Site

Again, the problem isn't that people don't know when/where the games are. The problem is that they don't want to come. Simply providing information is not enough. You have to create an interface that builds excitement. Look at your primary website real quick, select any sport, click to purchase tickets and determine if there's anything about that page that actually makes you excited about that sport. If the answer is yes, you're a step ahead, but you're still faced with the issue of forcing people to have to navigate through information about 25 other sports before they find the one they want to buy tickets for. There's a reason the producers of The Avengers built a website just to build excitement about that movie rather than just making it one of many options to look at on the production company's website. And there's a reason that every other major movie does the same thing. Using your primary athletic site to drive ticket sales is a mistake.

2. Off-Season Marketing Campaign

Most of the time, the marketing that takes place for a specific sport happens in the weeks leading up to the start of the season. It will typically continue through the season, but once the season ends, the marketing ends. Sure we send out ticket renewal letters and other information, but most of the time we cease to continue to make them excited about that sport. What we should be doing is actually ramping up our marketing efforts as the season comes to a close and keeping those marketing efforts going the entire off-season. One of the reasons RaiseUpCarolina.com was so successful is because it launched right at the end of the football season. Then, throughout the winter and spring, we were consistently pushing people to that site through a comprehensive marketing campaign. Because we were continually driving traffic to the site, marketing automation was able to do what marketing automation does. If you're not continually driving traffic to your site, you're not getting the most bang for your buck in what you're spending on marketing automation.

3. Digital Marketing Strategy

As discussed, marketing automation is only one part of a much larger puzzle. It is a force multiplier, much like the handle of a hammer. A hammer's head will drive a nail if you hit it hard enough. Add a handle to that head and it amplifies the force exponentially and makes driving that nail a lot easier. Marketing automation is the piece of the tool that makes your efforts exponentially more effective in driving ticket sales. What can make marketing automation even more effective? Other digital strategies that augment marketing automation. One example is geofencing. We can identify an area where you have a potential base of ticket purchasers and target them by geofencing that area and serving them digital advertising through whatever site or app they spend most of their time on. For instance, let's say you have a loyal and passionate fanbase at your basketball games, but those fans aren't coming to your football games. We geofence your basketball arena and all your fans have to do is use their phone to access the web in any way during that event. Once they do, we can then serve them ads on Facebook, Google, etc. to drive them to purchase. These ads will push them to your website where they then enter your marketing automation platform and now you're hitting them from all angles.

 

There's no question that marketing automation is powerful. A $500,000 increase in ticket sales at UNC is enough to prove that point, but it took a lot more than marketing automation to make that happen: A good program, a great marketing staff, a ticket sales team, a dedicated ticket sales website, an off-season marketing campaign and marketing automation. This season we'll be implementing a comprehensive digital marketing strategy including geofencing and hope to add yet another force multiplier to the ticket sales effort.

Want to know what (and how) your peers at other schools are doing when it comes to attendance, game experience, ticket sales, and marketing? Here’s your chance to find out!



You’re invited to participate in our State of Sports Marketing survey. It only takes a few minutes to complete, and individual responses will be kept confidential.

What’s in it for you?

  • The inside scoop. Participants will have the option to receive a special insiders’ report with full survey results that won’t be shared with the general public.
  • Gift cards! We’ll be giving away Amazon gift cards with values up to $100 to 15 lucky survey participants. All you have to do is opt in for a chance to win at the end of the survey.

So share your thoughts, score some free stuff, and find out what’s really going on in the industry. And share it with your friends who also work in college athletics.

Why share the survey? The more people who take it, the better you'll be able to see what's going on in the industry in terms of attendance, marketing techniques, game day experience, and more! Anyone who takes the survey is eligible to win one of the gift cards we're giving away (get up to $100 on Amazon!) and receive a copy of the exclusive Insiders' Report.

Take and share the survey now! It’s only open through Oct 21st.

Click here.

 

A few of us went to a digital marketing conference recently, and one of the speakers talked about storytelling. It kind of took us by surprise. A digital conference should be about high-tech stuff, right? And storytelling has been around since before any kind of tech existed.

But here’s the thing. Engaging your fans online is like telling a story. You get people interested in who you are and what you offer with the story you tell through digital and social media. You get them to come back to your website time after time through storytelling. If you do not tell the right story, in the right way, consumers lose interest.

So how do you tell a good story in the digital world? These tips 7 tips for digital storytelling will help you capture attention and build trust.


1. Be genuine.

Marketing can be tough. All marketers are liars, right? That’s what some people think, so it’s your job to convince them otherwise. You have convey your brand’s message in a way that is honest and appeals to people. Spend a minute thinking about the recent stories that have been proven to be false and how that worked out for people (cough, cough…Lochte).

2. Utilize your resources.

Not sure you have a story? There are so many around you that you can tell. Use them! You have access to the locker room, to the players, and to the coaches in one way or another. Tell those stories. Most of your fans or players probably won’t take the initiative to share their stories on Facebook or other social media outlets. Seek their stories out and share them.

3. Seek out stories and write them down.

This one seems simple enough, but most of us forget to do jot things down…which means we forget about them. Keep a running log of things you can use in the future. If you overheard an employee talking to a fan and felt the message was great, write it down, record it, do whatever it takes to get a record of that story so you can retell it down the road. It’s not every day that you get to share how your athletic department helped make someone’s dream come true. But if you look for these stories, you might be surprised at how often they actually do happen. Write them down so you can remember to share your story with the community. That also helps you avoid those social media upkeep panic moments, because you’ll always have a good story to use.

4. Ask others to share their stories.

This one goes with the one above. Sometimes you are not going to be able to tell a story as well as the person who originally experienced it. If that story helps further the community you are growing or helps engage your fan base, ask the individual to come out and tell their story. You can’t get more genuine that that. Plus, everyone else sees a fan who cares enough or had a good enough experience to share their story with the world. That’s powerful!

5. Pick the right moment.

This is probably just a general marketing rule, but even the best stories will fall on deaf ears if they are not told at the right moment. Think about it and plan. You want the right message, in front of the right people, at the right time. There’s nothing wrong with using tools to schedule part of your digital engagement, but if you forget to monitor what’s happening in the world you could accidentally make your brand appear insensitive, self-absorbed, or just tuned out of what’s trending.

6. Be creative.

Again, this is marketing 101. In addition to being creative with how you tell your story, the whole process needs to be creative. You need to look in different places to find the stories. Of course take the obvious ones that come your way, but don’t forget to turn over a few rocks or dig a little deeper so you can deliver something unexpected every once in a while. Then challenge yourself to find new and interesting ways to share those stories instead of doing the same thing every time.

7. Pick the right medium

Some stories can only be told in person, face to face. Others can work well in a video or as a speech. Some have the greatest impact when paired with an image, making them good choices for channels like Instagram or Facebook. Some are easy to tell in a few words, while others take a little more explaining. The point is, you need to find a way to deliver your story that fits the story and your community. Choosing the right medium will help you maximize the impact of each story and get it in front of the most relevant audience.


When it comes down to it, a lot of the work we do is storytelling. One way or another we are trying to help our clients tell their story to the world. Your brand has a story. As a marketer, part of your challenge (and opportunity!) is to find all the different chapters, scenes, and memorable lines that make up that story and share them with the world. If this is done correctly, it will help you grow your community and engage your fan base in a way that improves the relationship.

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